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Tag: ancient

U.S. envoy attend opening of ancient East Jerusalem road amid opposition

U.S. envoy attend opening of ancient East Jerusalem road amid opposition

World
June 30 (UPI) -- U.S. Ambassador David Friedman and U.S. Middle East special envoy Jason Greenblatt attended the inauguration of an archaeological site in Jerusalem on Sunday. Friedman and Greenblatt hammered through the final wall in front of Pilgrimage Road at the City of David National Park, underneath Palestinian homes in East Jerusalem in the ceremonial event that angered Palestinians and Israeli non-governmental organizations. Archeologists had spent the past eight years excavating the area that is believed to have served as a pathway for Jews traveling to Temple Mount. "The City of David brings biblical Jerusalem back to life," Friedman said. "It enables every one of us to stroll the corridors where the ancient prophets of Israel gave voice to revolutionary ideals of freedom, libe...
DNA analysis offers insight into Japan’s ancient population boom, bust

DNA analysis offers insight into Japan’s ancient population boom, bust

Science
June 20 (UPI) -- Scientists have gained new insights into the history of Japan's early residents by analyzing the Y chromosomes of modern Japanese men. The analysis allowed researchers to estimate the ancient human population living on Japan's main island some 2,500 years ago. "Evidence at archaeological dig sites has been used to estimate the size of ancient human populations, but the difficulty and unpredictability of finding those sites is a big limitation," Jun Ohashi, an associate professor of human evolutionary genetics at the University of Tokyo, said in a news release. "Now we have a method that uses a large amount of modern data." Researchers estimate Japan was occupied by the Jomon people prior to 500 B.C. Around 2,500 years ago, they were joined by Yayoi people. The Yayoi migr...
Barrier Reef corals help scientists calibrate ancient climate records

Barrier Reef corals help scientists calibrate ancient climate records

Science
June 18 (UPI) -- Corals can help scientists track ancient climate patterns, but new research suggests that traditional analysis methods for analyzing coral's ancient growth aren't as accurate as previously thought. Luckily, scientists have developed an improved method, a combination of high-resolution microscopic analysis and geochemical modeling. Researchers described the new technique this week in the journal Frontiers in Marine Science. Deciphering the climate records coded in coral skeletons is similar to deciphering tree rings. As coral grows, new layers of calcium are deposited. Each layer traps geochemical signatures that can provide clues to the climatic conditions. By measuring the amount of strontium and the lighter isotope of oxygen trapped in different calcium layers, scienti...
Ancient lunar collision explains the moon’s two faces

Ancient lunar collision explains the moon’s two faces

Science
May 20 (UPI) -- The moon has two faces -- the smoother, Earth-facing side and the rougher side, the dark side of the moon, which is marred by thousands of craters. Now, scientists know why the moon's hemispheres are so different. According to a new study, an ancient collision between a dwarf planet and the moon left half the lunar surface permanently scarred. Scientists have previously suggested Earth hosted two moons that merged billions of years ago. Planetary scientists have also previously floated the possibility of a collision between a dwarf planet and the moon. If the moon did crash into a dwarf planet during the solar system's earliest days, the structure of the moon's crust should reveal the signature of such a collision. Researchers were able to locate such a signature using s...
Ancient relative of the blue-tongued skink found in Australia

Ancient relative of the blue-tongued skink found in Australia

Science
May 1 (UPI) -- Paleontologists in Australia have unearthed the complete skeleton of an ancient lizard, an early relative of modern blue-tongued and social skinks. Analysis of the remains -- the most complete lizard fossil yet discovered in Australia -- suggests the 15-million-year-old reptile was remarkably similar to modern lizards. Scientists described the new species, Egernia gillespieae, this week in the journal Vertebrate Palaeontology. "This creature looked like something in-between a tree skink and a blue-tongued lizard," Kailah Thorn, PhD student at Flinders University, said in a news release. "It would have been about 25 centimeters long, and unlike any of the living species it was equipped with robust crushing jaws." Scientists conducted DNA and anatomical analysis of ancient ...