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Tag: Animal

How an animal ages depends on what early life was like

How an animal ages depends on what early life was like

Science
Aug. 17 (UPI) -- What determines whether a wild animal ages gracefully? New research suggests environmental conditions during an animal's formative years can affect the animal's aging process. To better understand the link between a wild animal's adolescence and twilight years, researchers at the Australian National University gathered data on 14 different bird and mammal species, including swallows, storks and kestrels, as well as deer, sheep, mountain goats, squirrels and banded mongoose. "We investigated the effect in two different types of senescence: reproductive senescence, measured as declines in reproductive output in late life, and survival senescence, measured as the decline in survival probability in late life," Eve Cooper, a Ph.D. student in the biology department at ANU, said...
Scientists try to measure impact of pollution on animal behavior

Scientists try to measure impact of pollution on animal behavior

Science
July 27 (UPI) -- Scientists at the University of Plymouth are developing experiments and standards for quantifying the effects of pollution exposure on animal behavior. Researchers know animals are regularly exposed to toxic chemicals. They also know pollution exposure can alter behaviors related to survivability -- feeding, finding mates and avoiding predators. But measuring changes in behavior isn't easy. In a series of new experiments, scientists at Plymouth revealed potential flaws in traditional ways of measuring animal behavior. In a previous experiment, researchers showed amphipods, small crustaceans, swim away from pulses of light. They also found the animals like to swim near the tank wall in the lab. But as part of their most recent study, scientists showed the shape and size o...
Understanding snorts can help horse caretakers improve animal welfare

Understanding snorts can help horse caretakers improve animal welfare

Science
July 11 (UPI) -- Horses snort more when they're comfortable and happy. The communication could help caretakers achieve more positive animal welfare outcomes. Proper care for animals involves minimizing stress. But how do caretakers know when animals are happy or bothered? Interpreting the emotions of horses can be especially difficult. Many behavioral signals displayed by horses are ambiguous, and studies of physiological signals have yielded contradictory results. Many horse owners and caretakers have noted an association between snorting and positive environments, but the connection hadn't been scientifically tested until now. Researchers in France monitored snorting frequency among 48 horses. Half were riding horses, kept in confined environs and separated in solitary stalls. The othe...
Animal products will still be used for notes

Animal products will still be used for notes

Business
The Bank of England has decided to carry on using chemicals derived from animal products to make its new plastic banknotes despite an outcry.An extensive consultation saw the vast majority of those who responded say they were against the use of the additives.But the Bank said the alternative of using palm oil raised environmental concerns and would cost the Treasury an extra £16.5m over the next ten years.The Government told the Bank it did not believe a switch would be achieve value for money for taxpayers.Campaigners launched a petition last autumn after it emerged that the new plastic £5 note contained traces of an animal product derivative.The Bank launched a review following the outcry and earlier this year decided not to scrap the notes, though it said it would hold a public consulta