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Appeals court tosses antitrust ruling against Qualcomm

Appeals court tosses antitrust ruling against Qualcomm

Technology
A federal appeals court has overturned an antitrust ruling against Qualcomm, dismissing arguments that it unlawfully squeezed out cellphone chip rivals and charged excessive royalties to manufacturers such as AppleByThe Associated PressAugust 11, 2020, 8:34 PM2 min readShare to FacebookShare to TwitterEmail this articleSAN FRANCISCO -- A federal appeals court has overturned an antitrust ruling against Qualcomm, dismissing arguments that it unlawfully squeezed out cellphone chip rivals and charged excessive royalties to manufacturers such as Apple. The 3-judge panel unanimously sided with the San Diego chipmaker in tossing out a district court's earlier ruling on a lawsuit brought by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission. It’s a victory for Qualcomm, since the earlier ruling could hav
US appeals court upholds Trump rules involving abortions

US appeals court upholds Trump rules involving abortions

Health
SEATTLE -- In a victory for the Trump administration, a U.S. appeals court on Monday upheld rules that bar taxpayer-funded family-planning clinics from referring women for abortions. The 7-4 ruling by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals overturned decisions issued by judges in Washington, Oregon and California. The court had already allowed the administration's changes to start taking effect while the government appealed those rulings. The changes ban taxpayer-funded clinics in the Title X program for low-income women from making abortion referrals, a restriction opponents characterize as a “gag rule.” Beginning March 4, the rules will also prohibit clinics that receive federal money from sharing office space with abortion providers, which critics said would force many Title X provide
Appeals court deals blow to Trump’s Medicaid work rules

Appeals court deals blow to Trump’s Medicaid work rules

Health
The Trump administration's effort to remake Medicaid by requiring low-income people to work for health care has suffered a serious setback after a federal appeals court ruled it goes beyond what's allowed by lawBy RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR and JILL BLEED Associated PressFebruary 14, 2020, 9:22 PM4 min readWASHINGTON -- The Trump administration's effort to remake Medicaid by requiring low-income people to work for health care suffered a serious setback Friday when a federal appeals court ruled it goes beyond what's allowed by law. The unanimous decision by a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit means President Donald Trump will have little to show for one of his major health care initiatives ahead of the November elections. The case involves Ark...
Eddie Stobart suitor appeals to watchdog over DBAY bid

Eddie Stobart suitor appeals to watchdog over DBAY bid

Business
A bitter fight for the future of one of Britain's biggest distribution companies will draw in the City mergers watchdog on Monday just days before shareholders vote on a controversial takeover bid.Sky News has learnt that advisers to Andrew Tinkler, the former boss of Eddie Stobart Logistics during its ownership by Stobart Group, will lodge an appeal with the Takeover Panel aimed at preventing DBAY Advisers from voting on 6 December in favour of its own rescue bid. Sources said on Sunday evening that Mr Tinkler's vehicle, TVFB, had acquired a 6.5% stake in Eddie Stobart Logistics on Friday in an effort to build momentum behind his own refinancing proposal.The developments represent the latest twists in an unexpectedly complex battle for control of a company which has been mired in financia...
Facebook appeals against Cambridge Analytica fine

Facebook appeals against Cambridge Analytica fine

Technology
Facebook has appealed against a fine imposed on it by the UK's data watchdog after the Cambridge Analytica scandal.The social network says that because the regulator found no evidence that UK users' personal data had been shared inappropriately, the £500,000 penalty was unjustified.Last month, the watchdog said Facebook's failure to make suitable checks on apps and developers amounted to a "serious breach of the law".It has acknowledged the appeal.This was the last day on which the US firm could challenge the Information Commissioner's ruling.The affair stems from the discovery that an academic at the University of Cambridge - Dr Aleksandr Kogan - used a personality quiz to harvest up to 87 million Facebook users' details.Some of this was subsequent...