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Killer of 400 cats thought to be a man in his 40s, but real culprits aren't human

Killer of 400 cats thought to be a man in his 40s, but real culprits aren't human

World
The mystery behind the killing and mutilation of more than 400 cats in London has been solved after a three-year investigation. The identity of the so-called "Croydon cat killer," named after a section of London, was thought by some to be a white male in his 40s but it turns out the culprits are cars and foxes, the Metropolitan Police found. “Following a thorough examination of the available evidence, officers working alongside experts have concluded that hundreds of reported cat mutilations in Croydon and elsewhere were not carried out by a human and are likely to be the result of predation or scavenging by wildlife on cats killed in vehicle collisions,” police said. The investigation into the cat killings was launched in September 2015 when Ukiyo, a 4-year-old ragdoll...
The job market is so good, candidates aren't even showing up for interviews

The job market is so good, candidates aren't even showing up for interviews

Finance
How to ace a job interview Chandra Kill had scheduled face-to-face interviews with 21 candidates to fill some job openings at her employment screening firm. Only 11 showed up. "About half flaked out," said Kill. "They seem so excited and interested, and then they don't show up or call and you are left wondering what happened. A year or two ago it wasn't like this." With the US unemployment rate at its lowest in 18 years, and more job openings than there are people looking for work, candidates are bailing on scheduled interviews. In some cases, new hires are not showing up for their first day of work. "We are in a unique situation where there has definitely been a shift in the employment world as far as supply and demand," said Susie Willingham, director of talent acqui...
Why perks aren't the answer to retention problems

Why perks aren't the answer to retention problems

Finance
Could future offices be homes for farm animals? Perks like free car washes, dry cleaning pickup and a fully-stocked kitchen can help entice new workers to join a company. But they won't necessarily keep them there. "It's a job seeker's market right now. That means employers need to work a little harder to find and retain talent," said Sarah Stoddard, senior public relations specialist at Glassdoor. "And when you boil it down to what employees are really looking for, it is traditional benefits with a strong company culture — one that really values employees." Having a strong company culture helps workers feel more purposeful and connected to their work. That leads to more engaged and loyal workers. "You can pay attention to how much people are paying and their p...
Investors fret about a trade war, but they aren't fleeing the stock market

Investors fret about a trade war, but they aren't fleeing the stock market

Finance
At a conference held by a top investment bank in Manhattan last week, attendees were asked to submit what they thought was the biggest risk to the global economy. When their concerns showed up on the conference screen, these words were the most popular: Trump, trade war and protectionism. Outside, meanwhile, the stock market was having another up day. In recent weeks, against the expectations of many on Wall Street, investors have not run for the exits as President Trump has stepped up trade brawls with China, Canada and the European Union. On Friday, when the Trump administration and China announced tit-for-tat tariffs on $ 50 billion of goods from each c...
Most Americans aren't happy with their salaries. Here's how to change that

Most Americans aren't happy with their salaries. Here's how to change that

Finance
Asking for a raise: Women vs. men Salary isn't the only factor that can determine our happiness at work, but it's a big one, for sure. Unfortunately, 65% of full-time workers don't earn the salary they want, according to CareerBuilder, and a big reason boils down to the fact that they haven't asked for more money. Specifically, 56% of employees say they've never requested a raise — but 66% of those who have asked received one. If you're dissatisfied with your earnings, you shouldn't hesitate to make the case for a higher salary. Here's how to pull off that conversation successfully. 1. Know your worth It's one thing to think you're making less than you should be, but it's another to back up that claim with numbers. Going into a raise negotiation with firm data wi...