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Amanda Holden poses with 'lookalike' – but some fans aren't impressed

Amanda Holden poses with 'lookalike' – but some fans aren't impressed

Entertainment
Or possibly not, considering that the Britain's Got Talent judge posed with her lookalike this week.Amanda, who is still looking great age 49, took to her Instagram page to pose with her apparent doppelgänger after they appeared on Ant and Dec's Saturday Night Takeaway together.AMANDA HOLDEN: AGELESS STAR DEBUTS SHOCK TRANSFORMATIONThe blondes were seem rocking mega-watt grins as they posed together for the snap.Amanda was rocking a black jumper and bombshell curls, while her lookalike was working straight hair and a yellow dress.She captioned the post: "Here's my lookalike for @antanddecofficial @itvtakeaway so much fun.INSTAGRAM/AMANDA HOLDENLOOKALIKE: Amanda posed with her supposed doppelgänger on InstagramINSTAGRAMNOT IMPRESSED: Some fans didn't see the likeness between the two women
Why aren't credit freezes free for all?

Why aren't credit freezes free for all?

Finance
Freezing your credit after Equifax hack...not so easyConsumer advocates agree that a credit freeze is the strongest protection against new account identity theft -- exactly the kind of fraud that might happen to the 145 million victims of the Equifax data breach, in which Social Security numbers, addresses, names and birth dates, among other information, were accessed by hackers. But the only people who get a free credit freeze in every state are those who are already victims of identity theft. As for the rest of us who want to protect ourselves and prevent ID theft, credit freezes probably aren't free. Approximately 158 million consumers between 18 and 65 years old in 42 states and the District of Columbia must pay a fee to get credit freezes, ranging from $ 2 to $ 10, according to the U...
6 things you should be saving for — but aren't

6 things you should be saving for — but aren't

Finance
The sandwich generationSaving money is a tall order for the average American. In fact, 69% have less than $ 1,000 in the bank according to a 2016 GoBankingRates survey. Whether you're on a tight budget or simply unskilled at personal finance, the time to change is now. Consider planning for these expenses to avoid unnecessary debt and worry.1. Emergencies We all hope that our job is secure and our roof will survive another winter, but life's emergencies don't cooperate with a master plan. Three in five people grappled with a major surprise expense in 2016, according to a Bankrate survey, and only 41% were equipped to pay for them. If this sounds familiar, take comfort in knowing that you aren't the only one living on the edge of financial risk. The average American household has around $ ...