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Watch live: Astronauts swap out batteries during spacewalk

Watch live: Astronauts swap out batteries during spacewalk

Science
March 29 (UPI) -- Astronauts Nick Hague and Christina Koch are preparing to venture outside the International Space Station for a 6.5-hour spacewalk. The flight engineers are scheduled to begin their spacewalk at 8:20 a.m. ET. NASA TV will provide live coverage of the spacewalk beginning at 6:30 a.m. The duo will replace batteries on the station's starboard truss, part of an ongoing effort to upgrade the ISS power system. Astronaut Anne McClain was originally slated for the spacewalk as part of the first all female spacewalk, but NASA cancelled it Tuesday because the right size spacesuit for both women to complete the mission is not available. Friday's spacewalk is the second this month. Last week, Hague and McClain swapped out three old nickel-hydrogen batteries and installed powerful ...
Sending astronauts to Mars would be stupid, astronaut says

Sending astronauts to Mars would be stupid, astronaut says

Science
One of the first men to orbit the Moon has told BBC Radio 5 Live that it's "stupid" to plan human missions to Mars.Bill Anders, lunar module pilot of Apollo 8, the first human spaceflight to leave Earth's orbit, said sending crews to Mars was "almost ridiculous".Nasa is currently planning new human missions to the Moon.It wants to learn the skills and develop the technology to enable a future human landing on Mars. Anders, 85, said he's a "big supporter" of the "remarkable" unmanned programmes, "mainly because they're much cheaper". But he says the public support simply isn't there to fund vastly more expensive human missions."What's the imperative? What's pushing us to ...
Emergency landing astronauts to launch again in spring

Emergency landing astronauts to launch again in spring

Technology
The US and Russian astronaut who were forced to make an emergency landing after a rocket failure will attempt to launch again next spring. NASA astronaut Nick Hague and Russian cosmonaut Aleksey Ovchinin were forced to make an emergency landing shortly after their mission launched yesterday.It was an unprecedented mishap for the Russian space programme and a criminal investigation is now under way to determine whether safety regulations had been violated during construction.According to Dmitry Rogozin, the head of the Russian part of the International Space Station (ISS), the flight is being planned for the spring of next year. The malfunction affected the booster rocket, which appeared to fail to separate properly. The pair are alive after they landed safely in Kazakhs...
US, Russian astronauts safe after failed launch

US, Russian astronauts safe after failed launch

Technology
The problem came two minutes into the flight: The rocket carrying an American and a Russian to the International Space Station failed Thursday, triggering an emergency that sent their capsule into a steep, harrowing fall back to Earth. The crew landed safely on the steppes of Kazakhstan, but the aborted mission dealt another blow to the troubled Russian space program that currently serves as the only way to deliver astronauts to the orbiting outpost. It also was the first such accident for Russia's manned program in over three decades. NASA astronaut Nick Hague and Roscosmos' Alexei Ovchinin had a brief period of weightlessness when the capsule separated from the malfunctioning Soyuz rocket at an altitude of about 50 kilometers (31 miles), then endured gravitational forces of 6-7 times m...
Astronauts escape malfunctioning Soyuz rocket

Astronauts escape malfunctioning Soyuz rocket

Science
A capsule carrying the two crew members of a Russian Soyuz rocket that malfunctioned on lift-off has landed safely in Kazakhstan.Russian Cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin and US astronaut Nick Hague are reported to be "in good condition", both Nasa and Russian media said.Search and rescue teams are now en route to the landing site.The rocket had taken off for the International Space Station (ISS) when it suffered a problem with its booster.The crew had to return in "ballistic descent mode", Nasa tweeted, which it explained was "a sharper angle of landing compared to normal".The Soyuz rocket had taken off at 04:40 Eastern time for a four-orbit, six-hour journey to the ISS.Mr Hague and Mr Ovchinin were due to spend six months on the statio...