News That Matters

Tag: baby

Spina bifida: Keyhole surgery repairs baby spine in womb

Spina bifida: Keyhole surgery repairs baby spine in womb

Health
Media playback is unsupported on your device In a UK first, doctors have used keyhole surgery to repair the spine of a baby with spina bifida while it was still inside the womb.Surgeons at King's College Hospital say the procedure is not a cure, but could be the difference between some children learning to walk or not. Sherrie Sharp and her son Jaxson had the operation 27 weeks into the pregnancy. Spina bifida was diagnosed after the routine 20-week pregnancy scans. They showed Jaxson's spine and spinal cord were not forming correctly. Gaps in the developing spine meant the cord was bulging out of his back and was left exposed to the amniotic fluid in the womb.This damages the crucial nerves in the spinal cord and could lead to paralysis, a lo...
Piers Morgan says royal baby name isn’t diverse – ‘Popular, white and middle-class’

Piers Morgan says royal baby name isn’t diverse – ‘Popular, white and middle-class’

Entertainment
Piers Morgan is unhappy about something. Again.The outspoken TV star took to Twitter to vocalise his thoughts on Meghan Markle and Prince Harry’s choice of name for their newborn son.It was reported earlier today the Duke and Duchess of Sussex named their arrival Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor.And, of course, Piers didn’t agree with the moniker of the latest royal addition, calling it a “striking blow for diversity and feminism”.The 54-year-old took to Twitter and wrote a scathing message, which read: “So the royal couple, in a striking blow for diversity and feminism, have given their son one of the most popular white middle-class first names, Archie.“And a second name, Harrison, that was chosen because it stands for 'Harry's son' (I'm serious..). Hilarious.”The message received mixe
Groundbreaking images of unborn baby in womb

Groundbreaking images of unborn baby in womb

Technology
Scientists have created 3D images of a baby's heart while still inside the womb - a development that could revolutionise the treatment of congenital disease before birth.Regular MRI scans of pregnant women were put through a powerful computer program developed by experts at King's College London and Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Trust. This then transformed the standard images - which are often unclear due to the baby's movement and the speed its heart beats - into clear three-dimensional images. Image: The development could revolutionise the treatment of congenital disease before birth These images then provide doctors with a clear view of any abnormality.Professor Reza Razavi, consultant paediatric cardiologist, said: "Application of thi...