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Tag: benefit

Coronavirus: Mariah Carey, Billie Eilish to play home-made benefit concerts

Coronavirus: Mariah Carey, Billie Eilish to play home-made benefit concerts

Entertainment
Billie Eilish, Mariah Carey and Alicia Keys will play a benefit concert with a difference to raise funds for those facing hardship as coronavirus spreads.The socially-distanced stars will sing live from their own living rooms in a one-hour charity special to be hosted by Sir Elton John on Sunday.The following day, Eilish will appear alongside BTS, Dua Lipa and others on another televised fundraising show.They will star on a special edition of James Corden's Late Late Show. Broadcasting from his garage, the British host will link up with BTS in South Korea, Dua Lipa in London, Andrea Bocelli in Italy, and Eilish, her brother Finneas O'Connell and John Legend in Los Angele...
81% employers feel new income-tax regime not to benefit staff: Survey

81% employers feel new income-tax regime not to benefit staff: Survey

Finance
MUMBAI: A survey of HR and finance professionals across companies has found that a vast majority (81 per cent) of them don't consider the new optional income tax regime beneficial for their employees. The government in Budget 2020-21 offered new tax slabs for taxpayers forgoing all existing deductions and exemptions. The survey conducted by HR specialist Mercer across HR and finance professionals from 119 companies found that as much as 81 per cent of their employees feel that the new tax regime will not benefit them. As much as 60 per cent respondents feel that those within the income bracket of Rs 5-10 lakh and Rs 10-25 lakh will be impacted by the new tax regime. "A higher 80 per cent of responding employers think that the new tax regime will adversely affect the retirement savings beha...
Financial advisors need a succession plan to benefit clients and their own firm

Financial advisors need a succession plan to benefit clients and their own firm

Finance
kupicoo | E+ | Getty ImagesThe aging army of independent registered investment advisors who have spearheaded the growth of the financial planning profession need to follow their own advice when it comes to their businesses — for their clients' sake, as well as their own.With the average age of financial advisors somewhere in their mid-50s and a big bulge of advisors now in their 60s and 70s, the fate of thousands of practices and millions of clients in the next decade remains in doubt. Studies show that most small advisors — particularly solo practitioners — have no successor to fill their shoes, nor very good prospects for selling their business to someone else.The reality is, they probably never will."The No. 1 way that independent advisors exit the industry is through attrition," said
Bank of Baroda to pass on RBI’s repo rate cut benefit to external benchmark linked loans

Bank of Baroda to pass on RBI’s repo rate cut benefit to external benchmark linked loans

Finance
Bank of Baroda said Monday that it will pass on the benefit of the latest 25-basis points (bps) repo rate cut announced by the Reserve Bank of India in its bi-monthly monetary policy. In a press release, it said that the benefit will be applicable on home, car, education, personal loans and all other retail loan products by linking all new retail loans automatically to external benchmark rate (repo). Under the repo-linked rate scheme, there will be a single rate offered for all customers whether they are salaried, self-employed or a non-resident Indian. The bank also offers an incentive to customers to maintain or improve their credit score to avail of the best rates. V.S. Khichi, Executive Director, Bank of Baroda said, "We at Bank of Baroda want to pass on the reduced external benchmark ...
Human-altered environments benefit the same cosmopolitan species all over the world

Human-altered environments benefit the same cosmopolitan species all over the world

Science
Dec. 4 (UPI) -- As humans continue to alter the landscape and transform environments, ecosystems across the globe are becoming increasingly homogenous. New research suggests the same cosmopolitan species are taking advantage of humankind's environmental disruption. And as the same cosmopolitan species thrive across planet Earth, more unique species are disappearing. To quantify the phenomenon, a team of researchers surveyed dozens of studies focused on population dynamics in human-influenced habitat -- urban, suburban and agricultural environs. "We sourced data from other published papers that measured populations in different types of habitat -- natural habitats and areas used by humans," Tim Newbold, a researcher at the University College London, told UPI in an email. Newbold and his r...