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Tag: bills

Study: Half of adults with heart disease have trouble paying medical bills

Study: Half of adults with heart disease have trouble paying medical bills

Health
Feb. 11 (UPI) -- Adults with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, or ASCVD, are having a tough time paying to treat their condition, a study says. More than 45 percent of non-elderly adults with ASCVD have financial troubles brought on by medical bills, and one in five say they can't pay their medical bills at all, according to a study published this month in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. "It is remarkably disheartening to see how many people suffer severe financial adverse effects of having atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease," Harlan Krumholz, a cardiologist and director of the Yale Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation, said in a news release. "We have much work to do to ensure that people are spared the financial toxicity of disease that is imposed by ...
5 jobs and health insurance: One couple's struggle to pay off $12K in medical bills

5 jobs and health insurance: One couple's struggle to pay off $12K in medical bills

Health
This is a Kaiser Health News story. Robert and Tiffany Cano of San Tan Valley, Ariz., have a new marriage, a new house and a 10-month-old son, Brody, who is delighted by his ability to blow raspberries. They also have a stack of medical bills that threatens to undermine it all. In the months since their sturdy, brown-eyed boy was born, the Canos have acquired more than $ 12,000 in medical debt — so much that they need a spreadsheet to track what they owe to hospitals and doctors. “I’m on these payment arrangements that are killing us,” said Tiffany Cano, 37, who has spent her lunch hours on the phone negotiating payoff plans that now total $ 700 a month. “My husband is working four jobs. I work full time. We’re a hardworking family doing our best and n...
Trump signs bills to help patients stop overpaying for drugs

Trump signs bills to help patients stop overpaying for drugs

Health
Insurers will no longer be able to bar pharmacists from telling consumers when paying cash would be cheaper than using insurance for their prescriptions, as a result of bills signed Wednesday by President Donald Trump. The two bills had broad bipartisan support as a consumer-friendly move to correct "gag rules" that many viewed as an egregious business practice. One bill applies to private health insurance and the other to Medicare. The measures bar health plans or middlemen that manage pharmacy benefits from getting in between pharmacists and their customers. No longer can pharmacists be contractually prohibited from telling consumers when they would actually save money by not using their insurance plans. Such head-scratching situations can arise because of convoluted deals between drug...
Buffalo Bills not ready to make QB change yet

Buffalo Bills not ready to make QB change yet

Sports
The Buffalo Bills' offense is a bigger mess than anyone could have imagined, and it was on display Sunday in all its ugliness during a 47-3 loss to the Baltimore Ravens. On a horribly rainy day, the Bills found a way to be even more miserable than the conditions. They managed just 10 first downs and 153 total yards, were 2 of 15 on third down, and averaged just 2.5 yards per play. "Overall, I thought we could have been better in a number of positions," coach Sean McDermott said. "I've got to look at the tape, to be honest with you, to get a better feel and making sure we were in the right spots before I give you a better read-out." The tape won't show anything different from what everyone saw: the worst offensive performance in the NFL in Week 1. And yet that has not moved McDermott ...
The remedy for surprise medical bills may lie in stitching up federal law

The remedy for surprise medical bills may lie in stitching up federal law

Health
This story is from Kaiser Health News When Drew Calver had a heart attack last year, his health plan paid nearly $ 56,000 for the 44-year-old’s four-day emergency hospital stay at St. David’s Medical Center in Austin, Texas, a hospital that was not in his insurance network. But the hospital charged Calver another $ 109,000. That sum — a so-called balance bill — was the difference between what the hospital and his insurer thought his care was worth. Though in-network hospitals must accept pre-contracted rates from health plans, out-of-network hospitals can try to bill as they like. Calver’s bill eventually was reduced to $ 332 after Kaiser Health News and NPR published a story about it last month. Yet his experience shines a light on an unintended conseq...