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Tag: bird

How Jade Bird went from 'brutal' open mic gigs to the Brit School and US success

How Jade Bird went from 'brutal' open mic gigs to the Brit School and US success

Entertainment
Here's a list of things that make Jade Bird laugh during our conversation: Coats, chickens, theatre school, her own songs, other people's songs, yoghurt, bathrooms, being cheated on, her grandmother's guitar and writer's block.The 20-year-old is vivacious and chatty and frequently hilarious - characteristics that have earned her legions of fans when she plays live (which is all the time)."I've often been told that if music doesn't work out I could be a comedian," she guffaws. "I'm like, 'Thank you so much... Or maybe not?!'"Stand-up's loss is music's gain. The singer's British spin on Americana is compelling and gutsy, combining her love of Loretta Lynn with the punky energy of Patti Smith.It's already caused a fuss in the US, where Rolling Stone named her a "country artist you need to kno...
I hope Bird sticks it up England in Melbourne – Starc

I hope Bird sticks it up England in Melbourne – Starc

Sports
Australia v England, fourth Ashes TestVenue: Melbourne Cricket Ground Dates: 26-30 December (23:30 GMT, 25 December)Coverage: Ball-by-ball Test Match Special commentary on BBC Radio 5 live sports extra, Radio 4 LW, online, tablets, mobiles and BBC Sport app. Live text commentary on the BBC Sport website and app.Injured Australia bowler Mitchell Starc hopes his replacement Jackson Bird "sticks it up" England in the fourth Test, which starts on 26 December.Starc, the leading wicket-taker in the series with 19, misses Melbourne's Boxing Day Test with a bruised heel.Last week England's James Anderson said Ashes winners Australia have "problems" beyond their first-choice attack.Starc hit back: "I think they have got bigger things to worry about than the depth of Australia's fast bowlers."Austra...
The other Dodo: Extinct bird that used its wings as clubs

The other Dodo: Extinct bird that used its wings as clubs

Science
The extinct Dodo had a little-known relative on another island. This fascinating bird ultimately suffered the same fate as its iconic cousin, but we can reconstruct some of its biology thanks to the writings of a French explorer who studied it during his travels of the Indian Ocean.In the middle of the 18th century, at around the time the US was signing the declaration of independence, a large flightless bird quietly became extinct on an island in the Indian Ocean. Today this bird is all but forgotten. Early explorers to the tiny island of Rodrigues in the Indian Ocean described a "Dodo" living on the forested island. Males were grey-brown, and females sandy, both having strong legs and a long, proud necks... but despite outward similarities to the iconic Mauritian bird, this wasn't in fac...
Bird pulled from brink of extinction facing poisoning threat

Bird pulled from brink of extinction facing poisoning threat

Science
The red kite has become more common in the UK in the past 30 years, thanks to conservation schemes.But, while numbers of the birds of prey are on the rise, scientists say human factors threaten to derail progress.Post-mortem tests on wild red kites found many had been poisoned by lead shot, rat poison or pesticides.The study, published in the European Journal of Wildlife Research, suggests poisoning of red kites may be slowing their rate of recovery in England.Dr Jenny Jaffe of the Zoological Society of London (ZSL), who worked on the study, said birds of prey, and especially scavengers, would eat animals that contained lead shot, leading to lead poisoning.''That can be changed by changing the shot gun cartridges to non lead, which a lot of countries do,'' she told BBC News. ''And, there i...
Smelly clue to bird navigation skills

Smelly clue to bird navigation skills

Science
They migrate thousands of kilometres across the sea without getting lost.The Arctic tern, for instance, spends summer in the UK, then flies to the Antarctic for the winter.Yet, scientists are still unsure exactly how birds perform such extreme feats of migration, arriving in the right place every year. According to new research, smell plays a key role when birds are navigating long distances over the ocean.Researchers from the universities of Oxford, Barcelona and Pisa temporarily removed seabirds' sense of smell before tracking their movements.They found the birds could navigate normally over land, but appeared to lose their bearings over the sea.This suggests that they use a map of smells to find their way when there are no visual cues.Previous experiments had suggested that removing bir...