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Man determined to walk again after blood infection from dog

Man determined to walk again after blood infection from dog

Health
A Wisconsin man who lost his hands, feet and parts of his arms and legs to a rare blood infection transmitted by dog saliva was praised by his doctors Tuesday for his positive outlook and determination to walk again with prosthetics. Greg Manteufel, 48, was discharged two weeks ago from the Froedtert & the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Since late June, he has undergone at least 10 surgeries during which surgeons amputated parts of each of his limbs because circulation to his extremities shut down due to the infection. "Through all of this, the real star of the show is Greg. He's had the most positive attitude of any patient I have ever met and he's approached this with a fight that I don't think I've seen in any patient," Dr. Patrick Hettinger, a plastic surgeon, said during...
Young blood an elixir that prevents illness, study reveals

Young blood an elixir that prevents illness, study reveals

Technology
Blood taken from a young person could be the key to maintaining long-lasting health in old age, scientists claim. Blood factors obtained from young beings can improve late-life health in animals, the study published in Nature journal revealed.It could also help reduce the chances of developing age-related diseases, the scientists at University College London (UCL) said.Dame Linda Partridge, a geneticist at UCL, said research shows that young blood could allow humans to live a life free of diseases such as cancer and heart disease right up until their deaths."I would say ageing is the emperor of all diseases," she told The Times."A lot of people regard ageing as 'natural' and that therefore you shouldn't interfere with nature. But we've always considered it an ethical impera...
Could a blood test lead to new treatments for depression?

Could a blood test lead to new treatments for depression?

Health
Depression is among the leading causes of disability worldwide, with more than 300 million people suffering from this mental illness, according to the World Health Organization. Despite how common depression is, scientists still have a lot to learn about it. Among what is known is that depression is not a single disease but a variety of feelings and behaviors that may have different underlying causes. “Depressive disorders can present differently in different people. What is known now is that depression affects not just the brain but the whole organism,”said Natalie Rasgon, a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Stanford University. But a new study of which Rasgon is a senior author finds evidence of a possible biomarker for major depressive disorder, which c...
Rare blood moon stuns worldwide – but not in UK

Rare blood moon stuns worldwide – but not in UK

Technology
From Greece to Abu Dhabi, Australia to Iraq, a stunning blood moon as spectacular as it was rare lit up the night sky around the world on Friday night.It marked the start of the longest total lunar eclipse we will see this century, passing between the sun and the Earth for a grand total of 103 minutes.Lauded as a "real celestial treat" by Professor Andrew Coats of Mullard Space Science Laboratory, and a "freak of nature" by space journalist Sarah Cruddas, it certainly lived up to its billing.A blood moon is actually a lunar eclipse - caused by the Earth passing between the moon and the sun.Only light that is refracted through Earth's atmosphere manages to reach the moon, with everything outside of the red wavelengths being scattered, leaving the moon looking blood red.An incredibly stormy ...
Genetic changes in blood may predict leukemia diagnosis

Genetic changes in blood may predict leukemia diagnosis

Health
July 9 (UPI) -- Studying genetic changes in blood, researchers have found a way to identify people at high risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia several years before diagnosis. In the study, published Monday in the journal Nature, researchers from around the world found changes in DNA can reveal the roots of AML in healthy people an average of 6.3 years before symptoms. The researchers hope that methods of reducing the likelihood of developing the cancer will arise with earlier detection and monitoring of those at risk of AML. "Acute myeloid leukemia often appears very suddenly in patients, so we were surprised to discover that its origins are generally detectable more than five years before the disease develops," first author Dr Grace Collord, of the Wellcome Sanger Institute and Un...