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Tag: blood

Deportation concerns may increase high blood pressure risk in immigrant communities

Deportation concerns may increase high blood pressure risk in immigrant communities

Health
Nov. 27 (UPI) -- Changing policies and more aggressive immigration enforcement have increased concerns among recent immigrants -- both legal and illegal -- in the United States, and the worries have been shown to affect health. In a four-year study of Mexican-born women who reside in an agricultural area of California, published Wednesday in the Journal of the American Heart Association, researchers found that study subjects more concerned about deportation were more than twice as likely to develop high blood pressure than those who were less so. "Our findings suggest that concerns around immigration policies and enforcement may have potentially negative impacts on the long-term cardiovascular health of immigrants and their families and community," lead author Jacqueline M. Torres, assis...
Blood inquiry judge: ‘Many left in grinding hardship’

Blood inquiry judge: ‘Many left in grinding hardship’

Health
All those affected by the contaminated blood scandal should receive the same financial support, no matter where they live in the UK, says the judge in charge of the inquiry.Sir Brian Langstaff said there was "no proper justification" for the "grinding hardship of many".Nearly 3,000 people died in the biggest treatment disaster in NHS history.The government told the BBC it was committed to guaranteeing equal support for all those affected across the UK.The judge's comments come on the last day of evidence from infected victims and their families.The long-awaited UK-wide public inquiry, which has heard personal stories from more than 180 people and thousands more in written evidence, will hear from clinicians and experts from February.It was set up to look ...
Ground-breaking blood test could reduce lung cancer deaths

Ground-breaking blood test could reduce lung cancer deaths

Technology
A ground-breaking blood test could cut the number of people who die from lung cancer each year.Lung cancer is the third most common cancer but it has a very high mortality rate. Less than 9% of patients survive more than five year after diagnosis - often because it is spotted too late. A trial of 12,209 high-risk patients in Scotland found that those who took the blood test were diagnosed at an earlier stage than those who received standard care.Oncimmune Holdings, the global company that designed the test, said it works by detecting autoantibodies made by the body's immune system as a natural defence against cancer cells.In a statement, it said: "Lung cancer was chosen as the first target of the technology because it is the world's leading cause of cancer-related death and is often detect...
Cincinnati Bengals guard Clint Boling retires because of blood clot in leg

Cincinnati Bengals guard Clint Boling retires because of blood clot in leg

Sports
July 15 (UPI) -- Cincinnati Bengals guard Clint Boling announced his retirement Monday after he missed all spring workouts with a blood clot in his leg. Boling, 30, was a fourth-round pick of the Bengals in 2011. The former Georgia Bulldog started 109 games, the majority at left guard, and played all 16 games in a season five times since becoming a starter in 2012. Boling met with Bengals owner and team president Mike Brown on Monday morning to confirm he was leaving football. "There were talks about the risks associated with playing again," Boling told the Bengals' official website. "When it came down to do it, ultimately I couldn't wrap my head around it with the family and two kids. "There's no doubt in my mind if I'm 22, 23 years old with no wife, no kids and it's just me playing fo...
‘Robot blood’ powers robotic fish in Cornell laboratory

‘Robot blood’ powers robotic fish in Cornell laboratory

Science
June 20 (UPI) -- Robot's still aren't conscious, but now they have blood, thanks to engineers at Cornell University. Scientists have developed a robotic fish powered by "robot blood." The hydraulic liquid circulatory system allows the robot to use, store and transfer energy. "In nature we see how long organisms can operate while doing sophisticated tasks. Robots can't perform similar feats for very long," Rob Shepherd, associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Cornell, said in a news release. "Our bio-inspired approach can dramatically increase the system's energy density while allowing soft robots to remain mobile for far longer." The unique hydraulic system powers undulating fan-like fins of the lionfish-inspired robot, helping it glide through its underwater envir...