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Study ties blood type to COVID-19 risk; O may help, A hurt

Study ties blood type to COVID-19 risk; O may help, A hurt

Technology
A genetic analysis of COVID-19 patients suggests that blood type might influence whether someone develops severe diseaseBy BY MARILYNN MARCHIONE AP Chief Medical WriterJune 18, 2020, 6:26 PM4 min read4 min readShare to FacebookShare to TwitterEmail this article A genetic analysis of COVID-19 patients suggests that blood type might influence whether someone develops severe disease. Scientists who compared the genes of thousands of patients in Europe found that those who had Type A blood were more likely to have severe disease while those with Type O were less likely. Wednesday’s report in the New England Journal of Medicine does not prove a blood type connection, but it does confirm a previous report from China of such a link. “Most of us discounted it because it was a very crude st
COVID-19 test can detect virus in saliva, blood, urine in 45 minutes

COVID-19 test can detect virus in saliva, blood, urine in 45 minutes

Health
June 12 (UPI) -- A new test is capable of confirming COVID-19 using urine, blood, saliva or mouth-swab samples in 30 to 45 minutes, according to a study published Friday by the journal PLOS ONE. The new platform relies on reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification, or RT-LAMP, technology, which has been used in the diagnosis of infectious diseases for years, the authors said. Advertisement It's also relatively inexpensive -- both in terms of price and costs associated with use -- they said. "We need more testing options if we are going to be able to stage a successful public health response to coronavirus," study co-author Laura Lamb, a research scientist at Beaumont Hospital in Michigan, told UPI. "This is a rapid test that does not require expensive machinery to run a...
Coronavirus: A third of hospital patients develop dangerous blood clots

Coronavirus: A third of hospital patients develop dangerous blood clots

Health
Up to 30% of patients who are seriously ill with coronavirus are developing dangerous blood clots, according to medical experts.They say the clots, also known as thrombosis, could be contributing to the number of people dying.Severe inflammation in the lungs - a natural response of the body to the virus - is behind their formation.Patients worldwide are being affected by many medical complications of the virus, some of which can be fatal.Back in March, as coronavirus was spreading across the globe, doctors started seeing far higher rates of clots in patients admitted to hospital than they would normally expect.And there have been other surprises, including the discovery of hundreds of micro-clots in the lungs of some patients.The...
Blood clots, skin lesions among newly identified possible COVID-19 symptoms

Blood clots, skin lesions among newly identified possible COVID-19 symptoms

Health
April 30 (UPI) -- Blood clots, skin rashes and other lesions might be among the symptoms some people experience with COVID-19, according to new research released Thursday. None of the reports characterize how common the symptoms are with the disease, which is caused by the new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention added six new symptoms to its list for the virus last week -- chills, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat and loss of taste or smell. Skin problems and blood clotting weren't among them. In a study published in the British Journal of Hematology, researchers from Ireland observed that patients admitted to the hospital with severe COVID-19 infection are experiencing abnormal blood clotting. In some cases, the clo...
Cigarettes, vaping cause similar damage to blood vessels, study finds

Cigarettes, vaping cause similar damage to blood vessels, study finds

Health
April 29 (UPI) -- E-cigarette users experience damage to their arteries and blood vessels similar to that of traditional cigarette smokers, an analysis published Wednesday by the Journal of the American Heart Association has found. Researchers who studied the arteries and blood vessels of current and former smokers and vapers, or people who used both, noted that both groups had augmentation indices -- a measure of arterial stiffness -- similar to traditional cigarette users, meaning that their arteries were just as stiff. They also observed that endothelial cells, or the cells that line blood vessels, appeared to be equally as damaged whether people used e-cigarettes, combustible cigarettes or both. "Many people believe e-cigarettes are safer than combustible cigarettes," study co-author...