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Tag: blood

Could a blood test lead to new treatments for depression?

Could a blood test lead to new treatments for depression?

Health
Depression is among the leading causes of disability worldwide, with more than 300 million people suffering from this mental illness, according to the World Health Organization. Despite how common depression is, scientists still have a lot to learn about it. Among what is known is that depression is not a single disease but a variety of feelings and behaviors that may have different underlying causes. “Depressive disorders can present differently in different people. What is known now is that depression affects not just the brain but the whole organism,”said Natalie Rasgon, a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Stanford University. But a new study of which Rasgon is a senior author finds evidence of a possible biomarker for major depressive disorder, which c...
Rare blood moon stuns worldwide – but not in UK

Rare blood moon stuns worldwide – but not in UK

Technology
From Greece to Abu Dhabi, Australia to Iraq, a stunning blood moon as spectacular as it was rare lit up the night sky around the world on Friday night.It marked the start of the longest total lunar eclipse we will see this century, passing between the sun and the Earth for a grand total of 103 minutes.Lauded as a "real celestial treat" by Professor Andrew Coats of Mullard Space Science Laboratory, and a "freak of nature" by space journalist Sarah Cruddas, it certainly lived up to its billing.A blood moon is actually a lunar eclipse - caused by the Earth passing between the moon and the sun.Only light that is refracted through Earth's atmosphere manages to reach the moon, with everything outside of the red wavelengths being scattered, leaving the moon looking blood red.An incredibly stormy ...
Genetic changes in blood may predict leukemia diagnosis

Genetic changes in blood may predict leukemia diagnosis

Health
July 9 (UPI) -- Studying genetic changes in blood, researchers have found a way to identify people at high risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia several years before diagnosis. In the study, published Monday in the journal Nature, researchers from around the world found changes in DNA can reveal the roots of AML in healthy people an average of 6.3 years before symptoms. The researchers hope that methods of reducing the likelihood of developing the cancer will arise with earlier detection and monitoring of those at risk of AML. "Acute myeloid leukemia often appears very suddenly in patients, so we were surprised to discover that its origins are generally detectable more than five years before the disease develops," first author Dr Grace Collord, of the Wellcome Sanger Institute and Un...
Stress triggers white blood cells, boosts heart attack risk for diabetics

Stress triggers white blood cells, boosts heart attack risk for diabetics

Health
June 26 (UPI) -- Stress hormones and white blood cells can be good or bad -- they can join together to fight infection and heal injuries, but they also can lead to heart attacks. Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine studied how white blood cells can rupture and hemorrhage in people with diabetes, because they are overactive, and cause inflammation in plaques in blood vessels. Findings from the new study were published Tuesday in the journal Immunity. "If the rupture occurs in the coronary artery, the person has a heart attack. If the rupture occurs in the carotid artery, it causes a stroke," Dr. Partha Dutta, an assistant professor of medicine at Pitt's School of Medicine, said in a press release. There are more than 100 million adults in the United States livin...
Machine learning can predict low blood pressure during surgery

Machine learning can predict low blood pressure during surgery

Health
June 11 (UPI) -- A new algorithm can predict potentially dangerous low blood pressure during surgery. Researchers have developed machine learning than can identify hypotension as much as 15 minutes before it occurs, and are correct about 84 percent of the time. The findings were published Monday in the journal Anesthesiology. "Physicians haven't had a way to predict hypotension during surgery, so they have to be reactive, and treat it immediately without any prior warning," Dr. Maxime Cannesson, a professor of anesthesiology at UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles, said in a press release. "Being able to predict hypotension would allow physicians to be proactive instead of reactive." Canesson said the tool can save lives -- even with a warning only 10 to 15 minutes ahead of time. "By findi...