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Tag: blood

What blood sugar spikes might mean for your weight

What blood sugar spikes might mean for your weight

Health
Knowing how your blood sugar responds to certain foods could be a key to weight loss, according to the researchers behind a new diet book. Drs. Eran Segal and Eran Elinav of Israel’s Weizmann Institute of Science tested blood sugar levels in 1,000 people after every meal for one week. They found that foods that created a healthy response in some participants produced an unhealthy blood sugar spike in other participants. The key to weight loss, according to Segal and Elinav, is watching how your blood sugar reacts to different foods. “For years, we've been trying to search for that silver-bullet diet that would work for everybody and we've been miserably failing,” Segal told ABC News. “And that's because the best diet for each person really has to be tailored to that individual.” Ther
New blood test may diagnose breast cancer up to a year earlier

New blood test may diagnose breast cancer up to a year earlier

Health
Dec. 26 (UPI) -- Researchers at University College London say they've found an early indicator of fatal breast cancer that could help doctors make diagnoses one year earlier than current screening methods for the disease.Using blood serum samples from almost 1,000 women, researchers looked for the presence of carbon and hydrogen molecules attached to a chunk of DNA called EFC#93. The method helped to identify cancer in 43 percent of women who were diagnosed six months later.The presence of those attached molecules, called DNA methylation, is a hallmark that a person's cancer could likely be fatal. Researchers say it can be detected before mammograms find cancer in breasts, allowing for earlier treatment.The method was also used to classify 88 percent of women who did not develop breast can...
Half of US adults have high blood pressure in new guidelines

Half of US adults have high blood pressure in new guidelines

Health
New guidelines lower the threshold for high blood pressure, adding 30 million Americans to those who have the condition, which now plagues nearly half of U.S. adults. High pressure, which for decades has been a top reading of at least 140 or a bottom one of 90, drops to 130 over 80 in advice announced Monday by a dozen medical groups. The change means an additional 14 percent of U.S. adults have the problem, but only 2 percent of these newly added people need medication right away; the rest should try healthier lifestyles, which get much stronger emphasis in the new advice. Poor diets, lack of exercise and other bad habits cause 90 percent of high blood pressure. "I have no doubt there will be controversy. I'm sure there will be people saying 'We have a hard enough time getting to 140,'" ...
FDA approves new gene therapy for blood cancer

FDA approves new gene therapy for blood cancer

Health
Oct. 18 (UPI) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a new form of cell-based gene therapy for adults with certain types of large B-cell lymphoma, marking only the second time a gene therapy has been approved for the disease.The therapy is called Yescarta and will be used to treat patients with the deadly blood cancer who have not responded to other forms of treatment."Today marks another milestone in the development of a whole new scientific paradigm for the treatment of serious diseases," FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said in a statement. "In just several decades, gene therapy has gone from being a promising concept to a practical solution to deadly and largely untreatable forms of cancer."Researchers call the gene therapy a "living drug" that attacks cancer cells through im...
Do e-cigarettes damage blood vessels?

Do e-cigarettes damage blood vessels?

Health
MONDAY, Sept. 11, 2017 -- Nicotine in e-cigarettes may cause stiffened arteries, which can lead to an increased risk for heart attack and stroke, a small Swedish study suggests.With the dramatic increase in e-cigarette use ("vaping") over the past few years, questions have arisen about their safety. And while many people think the devices are harmless, especially compared with regular cigarettes, little is known about long-term effects of these devices, according to lead researcher Magnus Lundback, from the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm."Increased arterial stiffness has previously been demonstrated following exposure to conventional cigarettes," said Lundback, who is a research leader and clinical registrar at the Danderyd University Hospital."We think that chronic exposure to e-cigare...