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Tag: Boeing

Boeing receives $30M contract modification for SLAM-ER weapon system

Boeing receives $30M contract modification for SLAM-ER weapon system

Business
April 17 (UPI) -- The U.S. Navy awarded Boeing a contract modification for Standoff Land Attack Missiles to support Saudi Arabia.  The Department of Defense announced the $ 30.14 million cost-plus-incentive-fee contract Tuesday. The initial $ 64 million contract in April 2018 enabled Boeing to "restart" its AGM-84 Standoff Land Attack Missile-Expanded Response production line and expand the production process. The modification allows for the redesign of obsolete parts, analysis and test planning for the weapon system.  Work on the contract was expected to occur in St. Louis, Mo., Indianapolis, Melbourne, Fla., and other locations throughout the United States.  The Pentagon said the contract was expected to be completed in July.  The total amount of the contract will b...
Boeing awarded $65M in foreign military sales for small-diameter bombs

Boeing awarded $65M in foreign military sales for small-diameter bombs

Business
April 16 (UPI) -- Boeing has been awarded a 10-year $ 65 million contract to provide small-diameter bombs to 12 foreign nations. This contract, which was announced Monday by the U.S. Defense Department, provides for integration, sustainment and support of the small diameter bomb Increment I miniature munition and carriage system on various platforms around the world. Support includes testing, engineering, management, technical and logistical activities. The number of bombs wasn't specified. The sales are to Australia, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Greece, Israel, South Korea, Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, Turkey and Singapore -- as well as future country with an approved letter of offer and acceptance. Foreign military sales funds in the amount of $ 2.5 million are being obligated on the firs...
Ethiopian Airlines crash: Boeing reduces 737 production

Ethiopian Airlines crash: Boeing reduces 737 production

Business
Media playback is unsupported on your device Boeing is temporarily cutting production of its best-selling 737 airliner in the continuing fall-out from crashes in Ethiopia and Indonesia. Production will drop from 52 planes a month to 42 from mid-April, Boeing has said in a statement. The decision is a response to a halt in deliveries of the 737 Max - the model involved in the two accidents. The plane is currently grounded as preliminary findings suggest its anti-stall system was at fault. An Ethiopian Airlines 737 Max crashed only minutes after take-off from Addis Ababa in March, killing all 157 people on board. The same type flown by the Indonesian airline Lion Air crashed into the sea only five months earlier, shortly after taking off from J...
Boeing Ethiopia crash probe ‘finds anti-stall device activated’

Boeing Ethiopia crash probe ‘finds anti-stall device activated’

World
Officials probing the crash in Ethiopia of a Boeing 737 Max have preliminarily concluded that a flight-control feature automatically activated before it crashed, the Wall Street Journal says.The newspaper, citing unnamed sources, says the findings were relayed on Thursday at a briefing at the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).The flight-control feature is meant to help prevent the plane from stalling.Boeing said it couldn't comment as the investigation was still underway. It said all enquiries should be referred to the investigating authorities and the BBC has approached the FAA for a response.Meanwhile, Ethiopia's Ministry of Transport said: "We have seen the WSJ report. We'll comment shortly."Thursday also saw what is th...
Boeing 737 MAX pilots scoured manual in minutes before crash

Boeing 737 MAX pilots scoured manual in minutes before crash

World
The pilots of a Boeing 737 MAX frantically scoured a manual before their plane crashed into the Java Sea in October, killing all 189 people on board.Recordings from the cockpit of the Lion Air plane suggest that the pilots were struggling to understand why the jet was lurching downwards, but ran out of time before it hit the water. Two minutes into the flight, the first officer reported a "flight control problem" to air traffic control and said that they intended to maintain an altitude of 5,000ft. Image: Faulty sensors are believed to have been a factor in October's Lion Air crash The captain was at the controls of the nearly new plane when it took off from Jakarta, and as an indicator showed a problem on his display, he asked the first officer ...