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Tag: brain

Some with schizophrenia have similar brain function to healthy people

Some with schizophrenia have similar brain function to healthy people

Health
Jan. 4 (UPI) -- The brains of healthy people may be similar to those of people with schizophrenia, a study says. A study of 179 people -- 109 with schizophrenia and 70 without it -- published Friday in the American Journal of Psychiatry shows the brain similaries in MRI scans and facial recognition tests. The findings, which reflect participants with and without the condition, broke participants down into three distinct facial types -- typical, over-activated and de-activated profiles -- helping the researchers determine similarities and differences between each of them. "We think those with over-activated networks may be 'inefficient' in terms of brain activity -- they probably struggled more and needed to work harder to do the same task compared to the other groups," says Dr. Hawco. "Th...
Bees can count using only four brain cells

Bees can count using only four brain cells

Science
Dec. 21 (UPI) -- New research reveals how bees count using minimal brain power. To better understand bees' mathematic abilities, scientists designed a simple brain model on the computer, featuring just four nerve cells. Simulations showed the simple brain was capable of counting small quantities by closely studying one item at a time. Previous studies suggest bees count the same way. Meanwhile, humans look at the whole group of items and count them together. In lab experiments, bees can count upwards of five and can be trained to select the smaller or larger of two values. Bees can even choose the value of zero, when trained to select the lesser of two quantities. The latest research suggests bees don't need to understand complex math to achieve these feats of quantitative comparison. By...
Study: Radiation causes cognition damage in brain cancer patients

Study: Radiation causes cognition damage in brain cancer patients

Health
Nov. 14 (UPI) -- Treating brain tumors in children can take away one problem while bringing about another. More than half the patients who receive radiation therapy to treat brain tumors get irreversible cognitive damage, and those consequences are especially harmful to children. But that could all soon change. According to a study published Tuesday in the journal eLife, the drug PLX5622 can stop radiation-related cognitive decline could be the the answer. "When the brain's immune system is activated by an insult, like radiation, we generally see that microglia start to affect synapses," Susanna Rosi, a professor in the Departments of Physical Therapy and of Neurological Surgery at University of California San Francisco and co-senior author of the study, said in a press release. In past ...
Brain organizes forgettable, indelible memories during sleep

Brain organizes forgettable, indelible memories during sleep

Science
Oct. 5 (UPI) -- Previous studies have highlighted the important role sleep plays in learning and memory formation. New research suggests, during sleep, a person's brain replays memories that go un-recalled when awake. For their study, neuroscientists in Germany recruited epilepsy patients electrodes implanted in their brains for surgical planning. The electrodes allowed scientists to precisely record brain activity patterns. Researchers had participants memorize a series of images. Each image was associated with a unique pattern of brain activity. Later, scientists measured the participants' neural activity while they napped. Researchers were able to recognize the gamma band activity signatures of each images. Their analysis showed, during sleep, the participants' brains reimagined each o...
Neuroscientists identify the origins of 'free will' inside the brain

Neuroscientists identify the origins of 'free will' inside the brain

Science
Oct. 2 (UPI) -- Neuroscientists have pinpointed the origin of "free will" inside the human brain. Whether or not free will exists -- or whether such a distinction is meaningful -- will remain a point of contention among priests and philosophers. What matters to neuroscientists is the interpretation, or perception, of free will. And for the first time, scientists have identified its cognitive origins. Scientists define free will as the combination of volition, the will to act and agency, a sense of responsibility for one's actions. Through an analysis method called brain lesion network mapping, scientists were able to pinpoint the origins of the two cognitive processes responsible for the perception of free will. "Lesion network mapping is a recently validated technique that allows scient...