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Tag: brain

Changes to tiny blood vessels may help diagnose traumatic brain injuries

Changes to tiny blood vessels may help diagnose traumatic brain injuries

Health
April 30 (UPI) -- By finding changes to tiny blood vessels in the brains of people with traumatic injuries, researchers believe medical personnel could be able to make more precise diagnosis and treatment decisions.Researchers found that changes in the blood vessels may be linked to a range of cognitive symptoms after a traumatic brain injury, or TBI. The research, which was led by the University of Pennsylvania, was presented Friday at the American Academy of Neurology Annual Meeting and has not yet been published."The relationship between microvascular and structural injury in chronic TBI has been recognized for years, but underappreciated," Dr. Ramon Diaz-Arrastia, director of the Traumatic Brain Injury Clinical Research Center at the Perelman School of Medicine at Pennsylvania, said in...
Miniature human brain implants survive, grow inside mice for months

Miniature human brain implants survive, grow inside mice for months

Science
April 16 (UPI) -- Miniature human brains, or human brain organoids, can survive and grow after being implanted in the skulls of mice. It's the first time human cerebral organoids have been installed inside another species.Researchers describe the breakthrough in a new paper published Monday in the journal Nature Biotechnology.Scientists grew the pea-sized brains from stem cells and then placed them inside the skulls of mice. Researchers removed a small amount of tissue to make room for the miniature brains. Tiny, transparent windows in the skulls of the test mice allowed scientists to keep tabs on the brain implants -- the organoids were also designed to express a green fluorescent protein, causing them to glow inside the mice skulls.Roughly 80 percent of the implants were successfully rec...
Brain imaging shows memory loss differs by age

Brain imaging shows memory loss differs by age

Health
March 7 (UPI) -- High-resolution brain imaging can be used to show memory proficiency between older and younger adults, according to University of California researchers.Using magnetic resonance imaging, researchers at the University of California, Irvine, found patterns in memory loss during two tests of memory, an object memory task and a location one."This suggests that not all memory changes equally with aging," lead author Zachariah Reagh, who participated in the study as a graduate student at UCI and is now a postdoctoral fellow at UC Davis, said in a press release. "Object memory is far more vulnerable than spatial, or location, memory -- at least in the early stages."As people get older, they often wonder whether its part of the normal part of aging or signs of early stages of a se...
Brain scan, AI may help determine efficacy of OCD treatment

Brain scan, AI may help determine efficacy of OCD treatment

Health
Feb. 14 (UPI) -- Researchers at the University of California Los Angeles have developed an artificial intelligence system to predict whether patients with obsessive compulsive disorder can benefit from cognitive behavior therapy.Neuroscience researchers at UCLA announced on Tuesday that a technique using brain scans and machine learning can forecast whether those with OCD should be treated with cognitive behavior therapy.OCD is a lifelong illness marked by repetitive thoughts and actions that can seriously impair work performance, relationships and quality of life. It is commonly treated with medication and cognitive behavioral therapy, or CBT, a form of psychotherapy. Treatment can be expensive and time-consuming, and is not always successful."If the results of this study are replicated i...
All that pecking may give woodpeckers brain damage

All that pecking may give woodpeckers brain damage

Science
Feb. 2 (UPI) -- Turns out, woodpeckers do get brain damage. All that pecking comes at a price, new research shows -- or does it?Until now, many assumed woodpeckers had a remarkably resilient brain. Woodpeckers absorb 1,200 to 1,400 g's of force every time they slam their head and beak into a tree. Just 60 to 100 g's is enough to cause a concussion in humans."There have been all kinds of safety and technological advances in sports equipment based on the anatomic adaptations and biophysics of the woodpecker assuming they don't get brain injury from pecking," Peter Cummings, researcher at the Boston University School of Medicine, said in a news release. "The weird thing is, nobody's ever looked at a woodpecker brain to see if there is any damage."When scientists analyzed the brains of woodpec...