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Tag: brain

Brain organizes forgettable, indelible memories during sleep

Brain organizes forgettable, indelible memories during sleep

Science
Oct. 5 (UPI) -- Previous studies have highlighted the important role sleep plays in learning and memory formation. New research suggests, during sleep, a person's brain replays memories that go un-recalled when awake. For their study, neuroscientists in Germany recruited epilepsy patients electrodes implanted in their brains for surgical planning. The electrodes allowed scientists to precisely record brain activity patterns. Researchers had participants memorize a series of images. Each image was associated with a unique pattern of brain activity. Later, scientists measured the participants' neural activity while they napped. Researchers were able to recognize the gamma band activity signatures of each images. Their analysis showed, during sleep, the participants' brains reimagined each o...
Neuroscientists identify the origins of 'free will' inside the brain

Neuroscientists identify the origins of 'free will' inside the brain

Science
Oct. 2 (UPI) -- Neuroscientists have pinpointed the origin of "free will" inside the human brain. Whether or not free will exists -- or whether such a distinction is meaningful -- will remain a point of contention among priests and philosophers. What matters to neuroscientists is the interpretation, or perception, of free will. And for the first time, scientists have identified its cognitive origins. Scientists define free will as the combination of volition, the will to act and agency, a sense of responsibility for one's actions. Through an analysis method called brain lesion network mapping, scientists were able to pinpoint the origins of the two cognitive processes responsible for the perception of free will. "Lesion network mapping is a recently validated technique that allows scient...
Researchers to test individualized drug cocktails for kids' brain tumors

Researchers to test individualized drug cocktails for kids' brain tumors

Health
Aug. 30 (UPI) -- Using genomic technology, researchers are planning a clinical trial of individualized drug cocktails to treat children with a form of malignant brain tumor. Researchers at the University of California San Francisco plan to treat up to 44 children and young adults with high-grade glioma at the UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital San Francisco and other sites in the 18-hospital Pacific Pediatric Neuro-Oncology Consortium network. "One of the pitfalls in identifying the drugs best suited for each child is that many therapies fail to cross the blood-brain barrier or have a high enough concentration to cause a biological effect," Dr. Michael Prados, a neuro-oncologist at UCSF Benioff Children's Hospitals and founder and co-project leader of PNOC, said in a press release. "We are ...
Leopard geckos can grow new brain cells, study finds

Leopard geckos can grow new brain cells, study finds

Science
July 27 (UPI) -- Many reptiles and amphibians boast impressive tissue regeneration abilities. But only geckos are known to be able to grow new neurons. For the first time, University of Guelph researchers have identified the presence of stem cells responsible for neuron generation in the brains of leopard geckos. Scientists used a chemical tag that was incorporated into the DNA of stem cells that allowed them to track where stem cells traveled and what types of cells they became. Scientists were able to follow the tags to the lizard's medial cortex -- an oft-studied analog to the human brain's hippocampus -- where they witnessed the generation of new brain cells. "The findings indicate that gecko brains are constantly renewing brain cells, something that humans are notoriously bad at doi...
Deep brain stimulation promising for mild Alzheimer's patients older than 65

Deep brain stimulation promising for mild Alzheimer's patients older than 65

Health
June 19 (UPI) -- Alzheimer's patients older than 65 benefit the most benefit from deep brain stimulation, according to findings from a recent phase II clinical trial. Researchers at Toronto Western Hospital's Krembil Neuroscience Center for two years have been studying the stimulation of the fornix, a bundle of nerve fibers in the brain between the hippocampus and the hypothalamus. The findings, published this month in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, are an analysis of follow-up data during the second 12 months of a 2016 clinical trial. "We are encouraged by these findings as they continue to help us identify who will benefit most from DBS to treat Alzheimer's disease and learn more about this illness," Dr. Andres Lozano, a neurosurgeon at the Krembil Neuroscience Center and principa...