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Jupiter will appear at its biggest & brightest, with moons visible this month

Jupiter will appear at its biggest & brightest, with moons visible this month

Science
facebook twitter Email linkedin pinterest reddit tumblr Linkhttps://intranet2.upi.com/wdb/cms2019/stories.php?storyid=6671559935460&st_year=2019&story_only=1&jwsource=clAuto 406p720p406p270p180pJupiter's Great Red Spot could soon disappear Some may think that June's short nights make it a bad month for stargazing, but this month will bring the best opportunity of the year to see one of our closest celestial neighbors. People around the world can look to the night sky this month to see Jupiter shining bigger and brighter than it will at any other point this year. This is because Jupiter will be at opposition, when it is opposite side of the Earth than the sun. This is also around the time when the two planets are closest to each other. The Jupiter opposition wil...
Watch February's super snow moon, the brightest full moon of the year

Watch February's super snow moon, the brightest full moon of the year

Science
Feb. 18 (UPI) -- February's full moon comes as Earth's satellite is making its closet approach, making the full moon a supermoon. During its perigee, the moon is several thousand miles closer than it is on average, making it appear especially full. This month's full moon will peak at 10:54 a.m. ET. The sun will drown out the moon's brightness, so the best time to see the supermoon will be overnight. Each month's full moon goes by a nickname; some full moons have several alternate names. "In ancient times, people across Europe and Native Americans used the moon to track the seasons," according to the Old Farmer's Almanac. "In the lunar calendar, names were often given to each month's moon." February's full moon is known as the snow moon, a reference to its presence during a month that bri...
Mosaic showcases Ceres' brightest bright spot

Mosaic showcases Ceres' brightest bright spot

Science
Sept. 7 (UPI) -- A new mosaic image shared Friday by NASA showcases one of Ceres' bright spots. The dwarf planet's bright spots were first discovered and photographed in 2015. In the time since, high resolution images have offered scientists clearer and clearer views of the bright spots. Ceres' brightest spot is located on a feature called Cerealia Facula, found in the Occator Crater. The latest mosaic combines several photographs of the feature, some from altitudes as low as 22 miles above the dwarf planet's surface. "The mosaic is overlain on a topography model based on images obtained during Dawn's low altitude mapping orbit," according to NASA. NASA scientists believe Ceres' bright spots are evidence of geologic activity. When Dawn was first approaching Ceres, only a couple of large ...