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Cafe Rouge and Bella Italia owner cuts 1,900 jobs

Cafe Rouge and Bella Italia owner cuts 1,900 jobs

Business
Casual Dining Group, owner of Bella Italia, Cafe Rouge and Las Iguanas, is to cut more than 1,900 jobs and close 91 restaurants after calling in administrators.It blamed the "extreme operating environment" - which has seen restaurants shut since the start of the coronavirus lockdown in March. The closures represent more than a third of the company's 250 UK sites around the UK. It leaves around 4,050 employees still in work, with 1,909 facing redundancy. Image: 34 Bella Italia sites will shut It comes a day after Sky News revealed that specialist turnaround funds are vying to take control of the brands.The announcement adds to the grim toll of thousands of job losses already announced in recent days as the coronavirus jobs crisis deepe...
Coronavirus: 6,000 jobs at risk at Cafe Rouge and Bella Italia owner

Coronavirus: 6,000 jobs at risk at Cafe Rouge and Bella Italia owner

Business
The owner of High Street restaurant chains Cafe Rouge and Bella Italia has filed intent to appoint administrators at the High Court.Owner Casual Dining Group, whose brands also include the Las Iguanas chain, employs about 6,000 people.The company said the move would give it ten days breathing space to consider "all options" for restructuring.Restaurants have been hit hard after shutting their doors in March as part of Britain's virus lockdown.Earlier on Monday, Casual Dining Group said that it is working with advisers from corporate finance firm AlixPartners over a potential restructuring programme.A Casual Dining Group spokeswoman said: "As is widely acknowledged, this is an unprecedented situation for our industry and, like many other companies across t...
Study details the physics of a café latte

Study details the physics of a café latte

Science
Dec. 13 (UPI) -- New research by scientists sat Princeton University has revealed the physics underlying the delicious layers of a café latte."The structure formation in a latte is surprising because it evolves from the chaotic, initial pouring and mixing of fluids into a very organized, distinct arrangement of layers," researcher Nan Xue said in a news release.Xue is a grad student student working in the lab of Howard Stone, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Princeton.Though inspired by an everyday drink order, Xue's investigation yielded insights into the layering of fluids -- insights that could have a variety of useful applications."From a manufacturing perspective, a single pouring process is much simpler than the traditional sequential stacking of layers in a strat...