News That Matters

Tag: cancer

YouTube advertises big brands alongside fake cancer cure videos

YouTube advertises big brands alongside fake cancer cure videos

Technology
Media playback is unsupported on your device YouTube's algorithm promotes fake cancer cures in a number of languages and the site runs adverts for major brands and universities next to misleading videos, a BBC investigation has found.Searching YouTube across 10 languages, the BBC found more than 80 videos containing health misinformation - mainly bogus cancer cures. Ten of the videos found had more than a million views. Many were accompanied by adverts. The unproven "cures" often involved consuming specific substances, such as turmeric or baking soda. Juice diets or extreme fasting were also common themes. Some YouTubers advocated drinking donkey's milk or boiling water. None of the so-called cures offered are clinically proven to treat cancer...
Ground-breaking blood test could reduce lung cancer deaths

Ground-breaking blood test could reduce lung cancer deaths

Technology
A ground-breaking blood test could cut the number of people who die from lung cancer each year.Lung cancer is the third most common cancer but it has a very high mortality rate. Less than 9% of patients survive more than five year after diagnosis - often because it is spotted too late. A trial of 12,209 high-risk patients in Scotland found that those who took the blood test were diagnosed at an earlier stage than those who received standard care.Oncimmune Holdings, the global company that designed the test, said it works by detecting autoantibodies made by the body's immune system as a natural defence against cancer cells.In a statement, it said: "Lung cancer was chosen as the first target of the technology because it is the world's leading cause of cancer-related death and is often detect...
Cancer ‘biggest middle-age killer in rich nations’

Cancer ‘biggest middle-age killer in rich nations’

Health
Cancer now causes more deaths among the middle-aged in higher-income countries than cardiovascular disease, a study suggests.Globally, heart problems and stroke is the leading cause of death at this age.But the researchers say people in rich nations are 2.5 times more likely to die of cancer than cardiovascular disease in their middle years.In poorer nations, the reverse is true - with cardiovascular disease three times more likely to claim the lives.The study, published in the Lancet, is drawn from a global research programme following the lives of thousands of people from across 21 countries. People from the UK are not involved.'Huge progress'Researchers led by a team from Canada's McMaster University looked at the fate of 160,...
HRT for menopause increases breast cancer risk

HRT for menopause increases breast cancer risk

Technology
By Lucia Binding, news reporter Hormonal replacement therapy for the menopause increases the risk of breast cancer and that risk can persist for more than a decade after usage stops.Researchers from the University of Oxford analysed data from more than 100,000 women with breast cancer from 58 epidemiological studies worldwide. They concluded that menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) was responsible for around one million breast cancers in western countries - one-twentieth of the total since 1990.The study, published in The Lancet, also revealed that even after stopping use, the excess risk of breast cancer was found to persist for more than 10 years, with the size of the risk linked to the duration of previous use.All types of MHT except to...
Jade Goody: Cancer charity hopes documentary serves as ‘a reminder’

Jade Goody: Cancer charity hopes documentary serves as ‘a reminder’

Entertainment
The UK's largest cervical cancer charity has said it hopes a documentary about Jade Goody will serve as "a reminder" of the impact of the disease.The finale of Channel 4's three-part Jade: The Reality Star Who Changed Britain aired on Wednesday.Goody's illness and death in 2009, aged 27, led to a 12% spike in women getting NHS smear tests at the time.But Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust said screening rates are now lower than ever and advised viewers to get checked."The episode is a new story for a younger generation and for others it's a reminder about the impact cervical cancer can have," the charity's head of communications Kate Sanger said."It has been fantastic to see that the documentary is generating conversations about cervical screening, especially on ...