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Tag: cancer

Infectious cancer affecting mussels spread across the Atlantic

Infectious cancer affecting mussels spread across the Atlantic

Science
Nov. 5 (UPI) -- An infectious cancer has spread from mussels living along the coast of British Columbia to related mussel species in Europe and South America. The reports of the disease's spread, detailed today in the journal eLife, suggest humans are playing a role in the cancer's proliferation across the globe. Scientists knew mussels in disparate parts of the world were being harmed by similar cancers but, until now, researchers weren't sure whether the diseases were transmissible. Most cancers are caused by DNA mutations that trigger uncontrolled cell growth. Most cancer cells don't travel from one individual to the next, but a few species have been affected by infectious cancers. "Tasmanian devils, dogs and bivalves have all developed cancers that can spread to others, acting more ...
Increased prostate cancer risk linked to higher dairy consumption

Increased prostate cancer risk linked to higher dairy consumption

Health
Oct. 21 (UPI) -- High consumption of dairy appears linked to higher prostate cancer risk, a new study said. Mayo Clinic researchers report in a new study, published Monday in the Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, that prior research has shown prostate cancer risk is higher in Western countries which rely on dairy as the main source of calcium compared to Asian countries. Instead of dairy products, Asian countries rely on higher amounts of plant-based foods, which have previously been associated with decreased prostate cancer risk, researchers say. The new study is the latest to suggest dairy consumption has an affect on cancer risk, following a call from a doctors group earlier this month to add warnings to cheese because of research suggesting it can increase breast cance...
Cancer to be ‘birthed’ in lab to learn prevention instead of cure

Cancer to be ‘birthed’ in lab to learn prevention instead of cure

Technology
Cancer will be grown in a lab by scientists trying to find ways to stop the disease before it develops.A new transatlantic research alliance of scientists from the UK and US, working on a five-year, £55m budget, will "birth" a tumour in lab-grown human tissue. The International Alliance for Cancer Early Detection (ACED), made up of experts from Cancer Research UK and five top universities, hopes to promote "rapid, cost-effective" early intervention over the "expensive firefighting of late-stage disease". Scientists are already investigating how to take cells out of someone at high risk of developing cancer and reproduce them using a 3D printer to test under what conditions they are most likely to turn cancerous.They also hope to develop screening tests that will detect multiple cancers
Cancer research: Scientists seek clues to how disease ‘is born’

Cancer research: Scientists seek clues to how disease ‘is born’

Health
British and American scientists are teaming up to search for the earliest signs of cancer in a bid to detect and treat the disease before it emerges.They plan to "give birth" to cancer in the lab to see exactly what it looks like "on day one".It is just one of the research priorities of the new International Alliance for Cancer Early Detection.Working together on early detection of cancer will mean patients benefitting more quickly, it says.Cancer Research UK has teamed up with the Universities of Cambridge, Manchester, University College London, and Stanford and Oregon in the US, to share ideas, technology and expertise in this area.Already thereTogether, the scientists are aiming to develop less invasive tests, such as blood, breath and urine tests, for...
Study: Cancer drug may cause metabolic imbalance, shorter survival

Study: Cancer drug may cause metabolic imbalance, shorter survival

Health
Sept. 26 (UPI) -- A new study suggests that the cancer drug nivolumab, a checkpoint blocker drug, may trigger a metabolic imbalance in patients treated with the drug. This imbalance, researchers say in the study, published in the journal Nature Communications, may trigger resistance to immunotherapy agents, leading to shorter overall survival times. For the study, scientists at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, collaborating with the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, analyzed blood samples from three independent immunotherapy trials. The analysis was designed to measure changes in chemicals involved in the body's metabolic reactions. Researchers found that 78 percent of melanoma patients experienced an increase in the tryptophan to kynurenine conversion, and 26.5 percent showing increa...