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Tag: carbon

Carbon capture could be climate change solution, or a waste of time

Carbon capture could be climate change solution, or a waste of time

Science
Nov. 8 (UPI) -- Earlier this year, the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy announced $ 110 million in federal funding for research and development of carbon capture and storage projects. According to DOE, carbon capture and storage technologies, or CCS, are "increasingly becoming widely accepted as a viable option" for coal- or gas-fired power plants to reduce their emissions. Carbon capture technologies promise to scrub CO2 from the flumes and exhaust pipes of coal and gas plants. The captured carbon can be permanently buried underground or sold for other uses like making fertilizers or boosting oil extraction. The technologies have been tested on small scales, but high costs have prevented wide-scale adoption. While subsidy-free wind and solar power now offer the cheape...
Climate change: Peatlands ‘turning into carbon sources’

Climate change: Peatlands ‘turning into carbon sources’

Science
Peatlands are a natural carbon sink, absorbing CO2 from the atmosphere and burying it in the soil.In Europe alone, they lock up about five times more carbon than forests.But according to a new study, the continent's peatlands are in such a dry and fragile state, they could go into reverse, releasing rather than absorbing carbon.Scientists say it is more important than ever that we restore and safeguard these boggy landscapes.Researchers examined 31 peatlands across England, Ireland, Scandinavia and continental Europe to assess changes during the last 2,000 years.The study, published in Nature Geoscience, found that most peatlands had become drier during the period 1800-2000 than they had been for the last 600 years. 40% were drie...
Area in Africa responsible for 1 billion tons of carbon emissions

Area in Africa responsible for 1 billion tons of carbon emissions

Science
Aug. 13 (UPI) -- New analysis of satellite data suggests between 1 and 1.5 billion tons of carbon emissions is emitted from northern tropical Africa each year. The latest research, published this week in the journal Nature Communications, suggests land use changes and drought have degraded the region's soil, leading to the release of large quantities of stored carbon. However, scientists say soil degradation alone isn't responsible for the region's carbon emissions. To identify other sources of released carbon, study authors suggest more research is necessary. Scientists quantified the land's contribution to global emissions by analyzing data collected by the Japanese Space Agency's Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite and NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory. Researchers compared the sat...
Bitcoin, Las Vegas have the same size carbon footprint

Bitcoin, Las Vegas have the same size carbon footprint

Science
June 13 (UPI) -- The latest audit of Bitcoin's carbon footprint suggests the digital currency is responsible for 22 megatons of CO2 emissions annually. Bitcoin's carbon footprint, according to the new study, is roughly the same size as the carbon footprint of cities like Las Vegas and Hamburg, Germany. Bitcoin is mined by specialized computers. Bitcoin "miners" solve computational problems to link together, or "chain," blocks of transactions. Miners are rewarded for their work, while the process ensures the security of the Bitcoin system. To estimate Bitcoin's carbon footprint, researchers at the Technical University of Munich surveyed a variety of Bitcoin-related data, including the IP addresses of miners and the IPO filings of hardware manufacturers used for mining computers. Bitcoin ...
Climate change: Half world’s biggest airlines don’t offer carbon offsetting

Climate change: Half world’s biggest airlines don’t offer carbon offsetting

Science
1.5 degrees Keeping the rise in global average temperature below 1.5 degrees Celsius will avoid the worst impacts of climate change, scientists say. That’s compared with ‘pre-industrial’ times. The world has already warmed about 1C since then. 2 degrees The original target for limiting the rise in global average temperature. Recent research points to 1.5 degrees being a far safer limit. 3 degrees The current likely rise in ave