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Tag: cause

Study: Cancer drug may cause metabolic imbalance, shorter survival

Study: Cancer drug may cause metabolic imbalance, shorter survival

Health
Sept. 26 (UPI) -- A new study suggests that the cancer drug nivolumab, a checkpoint blocker drug, may trigger a metabolic imbalance in patients treated with the drug. This imbalance, researchers say in the study, published in the journal Nature Communications, may trigger resistance to immunotherapy agents, leading to shorter overall survival times. For the study, scientists at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, collaborating with the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, analyzed blood samples from three independent immunotherapy trials. The analysis was designed to measure changes in chemicals involved in the body's metabolic reactions. Researchers found that 78 percent of melanoma patients experienced an increase in the tryptophan to kynurenine conversion, and 26.5 percent showing increa...
Wind shifts caused by human-induced global warming cause of West Antarctic’s melting ice

Wind shifts caused by human-induced global warming cause of West Antarctic’s melting ice

Science
Aug. 16 (UPI) -- Human-caused climate change has triggered wind shifts in Antarctica, according to a new study, driving accelerated melting across the continent's west coast. The research -- published this week in the journal Nature Geoscience -- is the first to draw a direct link between human-induced global warming and Western Antarctica's rapidly melting glaciers. Scientists have previously shown that influxes of warm coastal water are driving the loss of ice among Western Antarctica's largest glaciers. Previous research has also shown that variable wind patterns dictate the movement of warm and cold water masses. For the latest study, scientists used satellite observations and climate model simulations to analyze how these wind patterns have changed since 1920. The data showed the wi...
Thirty-year study reveals cause of coral bleaching crisis

Thirty-year study reveals cause of coral bleaching crisis

Science
July 16 (UPI) -- Corals are disappearing across the world's oceans, and most scientists have pointed to warming water temperatures -- the result of climate change -- as the primary driver. But new research suggests nitrogen pollution is the main cause of coral bleaching in Florida. The study, published this week in the journal Marine Biology, was compiled using three-decades worth of observational data collected at the Looe Key Reef in the lower Florida Keys. "Our results provide compelling evidence that nitrogen loading from the Florida Keys and greater Everglades ecosystem caused by humans, rather than warming temperatures, is the primary driver of coral reef degradation at Looe Key Sanctuary Preservation Area," lead study author Brian Lapointe, research professor at Florida Atlantic U...
Subclinical heart disease may cause more falls in older people

Subclinical heart disease may cause more falls in older people

Health
July 10 (UPI) -- Heart damage in older adults may be leading to more falls, new research shows. Adults around age 75 with subclinical myocardial damage and cardiac wall strain are at a higher risk of falling than those without those conditions, according to a study published Wednesday in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. These findings suggest increasing heart health could prevent their falls from occurring within the older population. "Given that falls can often be fatal for older adults, greater knowledge of the factors that contribute to falls represents a significant public health priority," Stephen Juraschek, a primary care physician at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and study lead author, said in a news release. "For the first time, our study shows that subclini...
Heart strain from extreme exercise doesn’t cause permanent damage, study says

Heart strain from extreme exercise doesn’t cause permanent damage, study says

Health
June 27 (UPI) -- Performing strenuous exercise, like taking part in a 24-hour ultramarathon, won't permanently hurt a person's heart, new research shows. High-intensity running puts more strain on the heart and drives up biomarkers that would otherwise indicate cardiac risk, according to a study published in June in Heliyon. However, those elevated biomarkers don't cause permanent damage. "Experienced runners performed with greater intensity and speed which placed strains on their hearts," Rodrigo Hohl, a researcher at Federal University of Juiz de Fora and study co-lead investigator, said in a news release. "Novice runners ran with less intensity, which resulted in lower cardiac biomarker levels." The study included 25 people who took blood tests before and after they ran in a 24-hour u...