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Study: Topical minoxidil reverses hair loss caused by radiation for brain, head, neck cancers

Study: Topical minoxidil reverses hair loss caused by radiation for brain, head, neck cancers

Health
Aug. 5 (UPI) -- Treatment with topical minoxidil helps restore hair loss caused by radiation treatment for brain tumors and other head and neck cancers, a study published Wednesday by JAMA Dermatology found. Twenty-eight of 34 patients treated with the drug after radiation therapy experienced hair regrowth in as little as three weeks, researchers said. Advertisement Minoxidil is an over-the-counter medication approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for hair regrowth in men and women. The patients suffered from persistent radiation-induced alopecia, or hair loss, as a result of cancer treatment, the researchers said. The hair loss from radiation is "a dose-dependent phenomenon," and was linked specifically to higher doses of radiation applied to the scalp, researchers at Memoria...
Cave sediments suggest global cooling 13K years ago not caused by asteroid

Cave sediments suggest global cooling 13K years ago not caused by asteroid

Science
July 31 (UPI) -- Geochemical signatures found in sediments recovered from a Texas cave suggest the Younger Dryas, a period of global cooling that occurred 13,000 years ago, was caused by a series of Earth-based processes, not an extraterrestrial impact. Previously, scientists in search of an explanation for the Younger Dryas have pointed to spikes in several rare earth metals as evidence that an asteroid or comet impact triggered the cooling. Advertisement Most recently, when researchers looked at the sedimentary evidence, they found these spikes in rare earth metals actually featured relatively low concentrations of iridium, ruthenium, platinum, palladium and rhenium -- levels inconsistent with an extraterrestrial impact event. "The isotopic signatures and concentrations can be explained...
New drug shows promise for pneumonia caused by COVID-19, study finds

New drug shows promise for pneumonia caused by COVID-19, study finds

Health
April 6 (UPI) -- Researchers may have identified a new drug that can reduce the lung damage associated with COVID-19. The antiviral EIDD-2801 was effective in mice at preventing severe pneumonia caused by the new coronavirus, which has likely been a key driver of serious disease and death in some of those infected, according to findings published Monday in the journal Science Translation Medicine. The drug has now finished testing in mice and will begin human clinical trials later this spring, the authors said. "This new drug not only has high potential for treating COVID-19 patients, but also appears effective for the treatment of other serious coronavirus infections," co-author Ralph Baric, professor of epidemiology at UNC-Chapel Hill Gillings School of Global Public Health, said in s...
Iowa caucus chaos: Trump calls it an ‘unmitigated disaster’ but what caused it?

Iowa caucus chaos: Trump calls it an ‘unmitigated disaster’ but what caused it?

Technology
A coding error in the app used by the Democratic Party in Iowa has been blamed for significant delays in reporting the results of the state's caucus.The new app was developed so caucus results - the votes of Democratic Party members for their preferred presidential candidate - could be reported more quickly following Monday's vote. But instead of speeding things up a coding error in the app led to the data being only partially reported, forcing the Democratic Party to resort to manual systems in order to verify vote counts. The results are now expected at 5pm local time (10pm UK time) on Tuesday.Shadow, the company which developed the app, posted on Twitter: "We sincerely regret the delay in the reporting of the results of last night's Iowa caucuses, and the uncertainty it has caused t...
Study measures river ice loss caused by global warming

Study measures river ice loss caused by global warming

Science
Jan. 1 (UPI) -- Many communities and industries utilize frozen rivers for transportation purposes during the heart of the winter, but new research suggests the planet's rivers are likely to spend fewer and fewer days frozen solid each year as temperatures continue to rise. In addition to supporting transportation networks, frozen rivers also curb the release of carbon dioxide from freshwater into the atmosphere. But just like glaciers, ice sheets, sea ice and frozen tundra, frozen rivers are vulnerable to accelerated melt rates. To find out how river ice is being affected globally by climate change, scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill compiled and analyzed nearly half a million satellite images of major rivers of the last three-plus decades. "We used more than 4...