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Tag: causes

Study: Black adults in rural areas more likely to die from heart-linked causes

Study: Black adults in rural areas more likely to die from heart-linked causes

Health
March 15 (UPI) -- Black adults who live in rural areas of the United States are nearly three times as likely to die from high blood pressure than White adults in the same areas, an analysis published Monday by the Journal of the American College of Cardiology found. Black adults also are more than twice as likely to die from diabetes and have an up to 40% higher risk for death from heart disease or stroke, the data showed. Advertisement Although racial disparities in health have improved generally across the country over the past two decades, much of these gains have been seen among adults living in urban areas, with "minimal" changes among residents of rural communities. "Our findings demonstrate that Black adults experience worse cardiovascular outcomes than White adults in the United S...
From doing yoga to charitable causes, how to lead a fulfilling life post-retirement

From doing yoga to charitable causes, how to lead a fulfilling life post-retirement

Finance
1/5Do yogaConstant monitoring and proactive action can postpone the onset of lifestyle diseases. “Today, many individuals are diagnosed with diabetes at the age of 25-30. It can be easily delayed by 10-20 years and in many cases prevented altogether with the help of diet and physical activities,” says Abhishek Shah, Cofounder and CEO, Wellthy Therapeutics. Take the case of 63-year-old retired banker Mahesh Nailwal. He has been practising yoga for the past two decades. “Regular expenses can spiral out of control if you have diabetes or other ailments. I barely need to spend money on medication thanks to my daily practice,” he explains.Getty Images2/5Keep diseases at bayPoor health results in expenses becoming unmanageable even if your postretirement income is high.” Data corroborates his cl...
Climate change: Extreme weather causes huge losses in 2020

Climate change: Extreme weather causes huge losses in 2020

Science
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WHO: Heart disease, stroke leading causes of death in 2019

WHO: Heart disease, stroke leading causes of death in 2019

Health
Dec. 10 (UPI) -- Noncommunicable diseases accounted for seven of the world's 10 leading causes of death in 2019, according to the World Health Organization, with heart disease continuing to top the list. Published Wednesday, the WHO's 2019 Global Health Estimates said noncommunicable diseases, such as stroke, Alzheimer's disease and cancers, made up seven of the 10 leading causes of death last year, accounting for 44% of all lives lost. Advertisement This represents an increase from 2000 when noncommunicable diseases only took up four of the 10 spots. WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said these estimates highlight the need to intensify global focus on preventing and treating cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes and chronic respiratory diseases. "They highlight the urg...

The Latest: Speed of viral spread causes concern in S. Korea

Health
SEOUL, South Korea — South Korea has reported more than 500 new coronavirus cases for the third straight day, the speed of viral spread unseen since the worst wave of the outbreak in spring.The 504 cases reported by the Korea Disease Control and Prevention on Saturday brought the national caseload to 33,375, including 522 deaths.Around 330 of the new cases came from the densely populated Seoul metropolitan area, home to about half of the country’s 51 million population, where health workers are struggling to stem transmissions linked to hospitals, schools, saunas, gyms and army units.Infections were also reported in other major cities including Daegu, which was the epicenter of the country’s previous major outbreak in late February and March.The recent spike in infections came after the go...