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Tag: Cave

Ancient shark found inside Kentucky’s Mammoth Cave

Ancient shark found inside Kentucky’s Mammoth Cave

Science
Jan. 30 (UPI) -- Scientists have identified the 330-million-year-old remains of an ancient shark inside Kentucky's Mammoth Cave National Park. While exploring and mapping Mammoth Cave's many remote chambers, expert spelunkers Rick Olson and Rick Toomey happened upon a fossilized jaw and several teeth embedded in a cave wall. Olson and Toomey took pictures of the fossils and sent them to Vincent Santucci, senior paleontologist with the National Park Service. Santucci reached out to John-Paul Hodnett, a paleontologist and expert in the study of Paleozoic sharks. Hodnett, program coordinator at the Dinosaur Park in Maryland, came to visit the Mammoth Cave fossil. He was excited by what he found. There was enough fossil evidence to identify the ancient shark species as Saivodus striatus. "T...
World’s oldest figurative cave painting depicts ancient hunting scene

World’s oldest figurative cave painting depicts ancient hunting scene

Science
Dec. 11 (UPI) -- Artistic expression is a vital part of the human story, and it's a story that began at least 44,000 years ago. The discovery of an ancient cave painting on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi has pushed the origins of figurative cave painting back further than ever before. The painting was first discovered by Hamrullah, an Indonesian spelunker and archaeologist, while working on a government survey in 2017. After noticing a hole in the ceiling at a cement plant where the survey was being conducted, Hamrullah clambered up a wall, through the opening and shimmied up a tunnel to discover a cave decorated in ancient pigments. The painting discovered by Hamrullah -- and since surveyed by an international team of archaeologists -- is described this week in a new paper published ...
Cave deposits suggest Earth experienced dramatic sea level rise 4 million years ago

Cave deposits suggest Earth experienced dramatic sea level rise 4 million years ago

Science
Aug. 30 (UPI) -- Scientists have discovered ancient deposits in the Artà Cave on the island of Mallorca that suggest sea levels 3.5 to 4 million years ago were more than 50 feet higher than they are today. Analysis of the speleothems, or cave formations, could help scientists more accurately predict how modern climate change will influence sea level rise in the decades ahead. To predict how melting ice sheets will affect sea levels across the globe, scientists need historic benchmarks. Mineral deposits in the Artà Cave have provided just that. "Constraining models for sea-level rise due to increased warming critically depends on actual measurements of past sea level," Victor Polyak, research scientist at the University of New Mexico, said in a news release. "This study provides very robu
Extinction: Humans played big role in demise of the cave bear

Extinction: Humans played big role in demise of the cave bear

Science
The arrival of human ancestors in Europe some 40,000 years ago coincided with the downfall of the cave bear, scientists have revealed.New evidence suggests humans hunted the bear and drove it from caves, putting it on the road to extinction.The fate of the species was sealed by other pressures, such as the onset of the last Ice Age, and shrinking food resources.The bear eventually died out 24,000 years ago."We see this dramatic drop in the population of the cave bear starting from 40,000 years ago, which coincides with the arrival of anatomically modern humans in Europe," said Prof Verena Schuenemann of the University of Zurich, who led the study."It is the clearest evidence we have so far that humans might have played a big role...
Aussie doctors bestowed Thai royal honors for cave rescue

Aussie doctors bestowed Thai royal honors for cave rescue

World
Two Australian doctors were given royal honors in Thailand on Friday for helping rescue a boys soccer team from a flooded cave and said they are looking forward to a reunion with the youngsters they helped save. Richard Harris and Craig Challen were given the award at a ceremony presided over by Thai Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha. Four Australian officials involved with the rescue effort were also honored. Both highly skilled divers, the doctors played key roles in rescuing members of the Wild Boars soccer team and their coach from the cave complex in Chiang Rai province last July. They said before the award ceremony they were looking forward to going to the northern province Monday to see how the boys are faring. Thats really exciting for us to go and see them and make sure theyre wel...