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Tag: change

David Attenborough climate change TV show a ‘call to arms’

David Attenborough climate change TV show a ‘call to arms’

Entertainment
Media playback is unsupported on your device Sir David Attenborough's new BBC documentary on climate change has been praised by TV critics.Climate Change - The Facts, shown on BBC One on Thursday, was a "rousing call to arms", said the Guardian.In a four-star review, the Times said the veteran presenter "took a sterner tone... as though his patience was nearly spent".Sir David, 92, has called global warming "our greatest threat in thousands of years".In its review, The Arts Desk said: "Devastating footage of last year's climactic upheavals makes surreal viewing."While Earth has survived radical climactic changes and regenerated following mass extinctions, it's not the destruction of Earth that we are facing, it's the destruction of our familia...
Climate change: Sir David Attenborough warns of ‘catastrophe’

Climate change: Sir David Attenborough warns of ‘catastrophe’

Science
Media playback is unsupported on your device Sir David Attenborough has issued his strongest statement yet on the threat posed to the world by climate change. In the BBC programme Climate Change - The Facts, the veteran broadcaster outlined the scale of the crisis facing the planet.Sir David said we face "irreversible damage to the natural world and the collapse of our societies".But there is still hope, he said, if dramatic action to limit the effects is taken over the next decade. Sir David's new programme laid out the science behind climate change, the impact it is having right now and the steps that can be taken to fight it. "In the 20 years since I first started talking about the impact of climate change on our world, conditions have chan...
Thousands of scientists back students protesting for action on climate change

Thousands of scientists back students protesting for action on climate change

Science
April 12 (UPI) -- Thousands of scientists signed their name to a letter voicing support for the students protesters calling for action on climate change. The letter, which scientists titled "Concerns of young protesters are justified," was published Friday in the journal Science. "We declare: Their concerns are justified and supported by the best available science," the letter reads. "The current measures for protecting the climate and biosphere are deeply inadequate." The letter was signed by 3,000 scientists. Thousands of students across the globe walked out of their classrooms Friday, the latest strike aimed at spurring action on climate change. "It's been a really fantastic day, with thousands and thousands of students protesting across the country, and continuing to build the movem...
The earnings picture is about to change, likely for the better, and Jamie Dimon may be a big help

The earnings picture is about to change, likely for the better, and Jamie Dimon may be a big help

Finance
The earnings picture is about to change, likely for the better, and J.P. Morgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon may be a big help. The trading community is on edge as JP Morgan gets ready to kick off earnings season tomorrow. Analysts have been fretting that earnings have turned negative for the first quarter, now expected to be down 2.5% for the S&P 500, the first down quarter since the second quarter of 2016. But early returns indicate analysts may be too pessimistic. Look at Fastenal, a reliable but boring industrial company that makes fasteners and construction equipment, beat earnings by a small amount and gave positive commentary, trading up ne...
Climate change: European team to drill for ‘oldest ice’ in Antarctica

Climate change: European team to drill for ‘oldest ice’ in Antarctica

Science
An ambitious project to retrieve a continuous record of Earth's atmosphere and climate stretching back 1.5 million years is officially "go".A European consortium will head to Antarctica in December to begin the process of drilling deep into the continent's eastern ice sheet.The group's aim is to pull up a frozen core of material almost 3km long.Scientists hope this can lead them to an explanation for why Earth's ice ages flipped in frequency in the deep past.Although it might seem at first glance to be a rather esoteric quest, researchers say it bears down directly on the question of how much the world is likely to warm in the centuries ahead. "Something happened about 900,000 years ago. The ice...