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Tag: change

Siberia landscape scarred by climate change

Siberia landscape scarred by climate change

Science
Scientists are warning that, across Siberia, vast swathes of ground - normally frozen all year round - are thawing - with potentially devastating consequences for the climate. As it thaws, the earth is believed to be releasing huge amounts of greenhouse gases, accentuating the problem of global warming. BBC Moscow correspondent Steve Rosenberg has been to the remote Yakutia region to look at how thawing permafrost is affecting not just the climate, but the landscape and livelihoods in Siberia..css-po6dm6-ItalicText{font-style:italic;}Producer: Will VernonCamera/edit: Matthew GoddardLet's block ads! (Why?) BBC News - Science & Environment
Underwater and on fire: US climate change magnifies extremes

Underwater and on fire: US climate change magnifies extremes

Technology
America's worsening climate change problem is as polarized as its politics. Some parts of the country have been burning this month while others were underwater in extreme weather disasters.The already parched West is getting drier and suffering deadly wildfires because of it, while the much wetter East keeps getting drenched in mega-rainfall events, some hurricane related and others not. Climate change is magnifying both extremes, but it may not be the only factor, several scientists told The Associated Press.“The story in the West is really going to be ... these hot dry summers getting worse and the fire compounded by decreasing precipitation,’’ said Columbia University climate scientist Richard Seager. “But in the eastern part more of the climate change impact story is going to be more i
Climate change: Earthquake ‘hack’ reveals scale of ocean warming

Climate change: Earthquake ‘hack’ reveals scale of ocean warming

Science
Scientists have found a clever new way of measuring ocean warming, using sound waves from undersea earthquakes. The researchers say the "hack" works because sound travels faster in warmer water.The team looked at sonic data from the Indian Ocean emitted by tremors over a 10-year period.As the seas have warmed due to global heating, the scientists have seen the sound waves increase in speed.Their new method shows the decadal warming trend in the Indian Ocean was far higher than previous estimates.Having accurate information on the warming of our oceans is critical for climate scientists.They understand that around 90% of the energy trapped in our atmosphere by greenhouse gases is absorbed by the seas.But having precise temperature...
Extinction: Urgent change needed to save species, says UN

Extinction: Urgent change needed to save species, says UN

Science
Humanity is at a crossroads and we have to take action now to make space for nature to recover and slow its "accelerating decline".This is according to a report by the UN Convention on Biological Diversity. It sets out a bullet point list of eight major transitions that could help stop the ongoing decline in nature. "Things have to change," said Elizabeth Maruma Mrema, the convention's executive secretary. "If we take action, the right action - as the report proposes - we can transition to a sustainable planet." What's the link between exploiting nature and human health?New diseases emerge in the human population probably three or four times every year. It is only when...
Easing fires not as simple as climate change vs. forest work

Easing fires not as simple as climate change vs. forest work

Technology
SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- Deadly West Coast wildfires are dividing President Donald Trump and the states' Democratic leaders over how to prevent blazes from becoming more frequent and destructive, but scientists and others on the front lines say it's not as simple as blaming either climate change or the way land is managed.The governors of California, Oregon and Washington have all said global warming is priming forests for wildfires as they become hotter and drier. But during a visit Monday to Californi a, Trump pointed to how states manage forests and said, “It will start getting cooler, just you watch.”Scientists say wildfires are all but inevitable, and the main drivers are plants and trees drying out due to climate change and more people living closer to areas that burn. A