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Climate change: Electric trucks ‘can compete with diesel ones’

Climate change: Electric trucks ‘can compete with diesel ones’

Science
VolvoThe view that battery-powered heavy goods lorries can't compete with diesel is being challenged by new research.It had been felt that the extra batteries needed for freight would make electric vehicles too expensive. But a new study says that if fast charging networks are built for trucks, then they can beat diesel in terms of cost.With fast charging, the bigger the vehicle, the greater the advantage for electric, say researchers. VW rebrand turns out to be April Fool's jokeChina's biggest car brand to launch rival to TeslaVolvo Cars to go fully electric by 2030In the UK, and around the world, there's a strong shift among consumers towards electric-powered cars. Figures for March in the UK saw sales of battery electric and plug-in hybrid cars reach 14% of the market.When it comes to p...
Climate change: China absent from key UK meeting

Climate change: China absent from key UK meeting

Science
WPA PoolA critical meeting on climate change, organised by the UK, appears to be the latest victim of an ongoing row with China. Ministers from around 35 countries are due to participate in today's summit on climate and development.But while the US, EU, India and others are taking part, China is notable by its absence. The UK says that China was invited to the event but is not participating. Relations between the UK and China have deteriorated in recent weeks after angry exchanges about human rights. Why are people not doing more about climate change?The people under threat from Uganda's melting glacierConsumers pose 'growing threat' to tropical forestsJust a few days ago China imposed sanctions on nine UK citizens - including five MPs- for spreading what it called "lies and disinformation...
Climate change: Consumer pose ‘growing threat’ to tropical forests

Climate change: Consumer pose ‘growing threat’ to tropical forests

Science
Getty ImagesRising imports in wealthy countries of coffee, cocoa and other products are a "growing threat" to forests in tropical regions according to a new study.Research shows consumer behaviour in the UK and other rich nations is responsible for the loss of almost 4 trees per person per year.Increasing numbers of trees are now being planted in the developed world, the authors say.But imports of products linked to deforestation undermine these efforts.This growing international trade is doing more harm than good for climate and for biodiversity say the researchers. The real reason humans are the dominant speciesGreen Homes Grant scheme to insulate houses axedWhy my Bangladeshi home could be lost foreverCanada's Supreme Court upholds national carbon taxAmong the world's forests, trees gro...
Bangladesh at 50: Why climate change could destroy my ancestral home

Bangladesh at 50: Why climate change could destroy my ancestral home

Science
As Bangladesh celebrates 50 years of independence, Qasa Alom reflects on how the country his British-Bangladeshi family still calls home is being affected by climate change. "Can you turn the air-con on?" I asked over and over but none of the grown-ups seemingly could hear me. "It's so hot!" My mum shot me a look that suggested I would have more than the heat to worry about if I carried on moaning. We had come to Bangladesh, the country of my ancestors, to see my grandparents, visit our village and, as I was constantly reminded, to "learn about my roots".As a child, I had spent my holidays roaming our lands - exploring the rice paddies with my younger brother, watching the farm hands tend to the cows and fishing in one of several fushkunis, or small lakes. It was a giant playground, full o...
Climate change, human activity threatens carbon uptake in recovering Amazon forests

Climate change, human activity threatens carbon uptake in recovering Amazon forests

Science
March 19 (UPI) -- Efforts to restore cleared forests in the Amazon are sometimes undermined by climate change and human activity, according to a new study. The research, published Friday in the journal Nature Communications, showed forest plots that have been frequently or recently disturbed by fire and human activity are slower to regenerate, stunting carbon uptake. Advertisement To curb climate change, many countries have promised to restore areas of forest previously cleared for logging or agriculture. Secondary forest growth can absorb a lot more carbon than old growth forests, but not all secondary forest regeneration is created equal. To better understand the factors that influence carbon uptake in recovering forests, scientists in Brazil and Britain used satellites to track change...