Tuesday, September 27News That Matters
Shadow

Tag: change

Climate change: Drought highlights dangers for electricity supplies

Climate change: Drought highlights dangers for electricity supplies

Science
Getty ImagesThe ongoing drought in the UK and Europe is putting electricity generation under pressure, say experts.Electricity from hydropower - which uses water to generate power - has dropped by 20% overall.And nuclear facilities, which are cooled using river water, have been restricted.There are fears that the shortfalls are a taste of what will happen in the coming winter.In the UK, high temperatures are hitting energy output from fossil, nuclear and solar sources.That is because the technology in power plants and solar panels work much less well in high temperatures.The prolonged dry spell is putting further pressure on energy supplies as Europe scrambles for alternative sources after the Russian invasion of Ukraine. Millions hit by hosepipe bans as drought declaredUS Senate passes sw...
Climate change: Key UN finding widely misinterpreted

Climate change: Key UN finding widely misinterpreted

Science
Mario TamaA key finding in the latest IPCC climate report has been widely misinterpreted, according to scientists involved in the study. In the document, researchers wrote that greenhouse gases are projected to peak "at the latest before 2025".This implies that carbon could increase for another three years and the world could still avoid dangerous warming. But scientists say that's incorrect and that emissions need to fall immediately.Coral reefs mapped to tackle climate change threatCOP26 promises will hold warming under 2CHow Russia's war threatens Brazil's indigenous landThe IPCC's most recent report focused on how to limit or curtail emissions of the gases that are the root cause of warming.In their summary for policymakers, the scientists said it was still possible to avoid the most d...
Climate change: Key crops face major shifts as world warms

Climate change: Key crops face major shifts as world warms

Science
Getty ImagesThe parts of the world suitable for growing coffee, cashews and avocados will change dramatically as the world heats up, according to a new study.Key coffee regions in Brazil, Indonesia, Vietnam and Colombia will all "drastically decrease" by around 50% by 2050.Suitable areas for cashews and avocados will increase but most will be far from current sites of production. The authors say that greater efforts must be made to help farmers adapt.Buried treasures threatened by climate changeCarbon offsetting 'not get-out-of-jail-free card''Fragile win' at COP26 climate summit under threatCoffee is one of the world's most important crops, not just as key beverage but as a livelihood for millions of small farmers. Getty ImagesAnd thanks to growing consumer preferences in richer countries...
Climate Change: Don’t sideline plastic problem, nations urged

Climate Change: Don’t sideline plastic problem, nations urged

Science
Getty ImagesScientists are warning politicians immersed in climate change policy not to forget that the world is also in the midst of a plastic waste crisis. They fear that so much energy is being expended on emissions policy that tackling plastic pollution will be sidelined. A paper from the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) and Bangor University says plastic pollution and climate change are not separate.It says the issues are actually intertwined - and each makes the other worse. Manufacturing plastic items adds to greenhouse gas emissions, while extreme weather such as floods and typhoons associated with a heating planet will disperse and worsen plastic pollution in the sea.The researchers highlight that marine species and ecosystems, such as coral reefs, are taking a double hit from...
Climate change: Whisper it cautiously… there’s been progress in run up to COP26

Climate change: Whisper it cautiously… there’s been progress in run up to COP26

Science
ReutersWith just five weeks left until world leaders gather in Glasgow for a critical climate summit, the BBC's Matt McGrath and Roger Harrabin consider progress made at this week's UN gathering and the outstanding issues that remain.Climate change was the dominant theme at this year's UN General Assembly (UNGA) as countries recognised the seriousness of the global situation. All across the planet, the hallmarks of rising temperatures are being keenly felt with intense wildfires, storms and floods taking place on scales rarely seen.World on course to heat up to dangerous levelsWorld now sees twice as many days over 50CWildlife and plant species decline 'a crisis'Against this backdrop, Boris Johnson told the UN it was "time to grow up" on the climate issue. The prime minister fought to brin...