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Tag: chemical

Scientists film chemical bond making, breaking

Scientists film chemical bond making, breaking

Science
Jan. 17 (UPI) -- Everything depends on chemical bonds. Without chemical bonds, everything would fall apart. And yet, scientists don't entirely understand how chemical bonding works. Now, for the first time, scientists have filmed chemical bond making and breaking in action. The breakthrough -- described this week in the journal Science Advances -- promises to offer scientists new insights into this fundamental atomic phenomenon. The main reason chemical bonding isn't well understood is that the processes happen on such a small scale. But atoms and their bonds aren't just tiny, they're also unruly. Atoms don't like to sit still. Luckily, a team of researchers from Britain and Germany have developed a way to trap atoms so they can be imaged using technologies like atomic force microscopy a...
Scientists turn fossil fuel pollutant into usable industrial chemical

Scientists turn fossil fuel pollutant into usable industrial chemical

Science
Nov. 22 (UPI) -- Scientists have developed a new material, called a metal-organic framework, that successfully captures nitrogen dioxide, or NO2, a toxic pollutant produced by fossil fuel combustion. The new gas-capturing technology can extract NO2 from the exhaust of a power plant or factory, according to the latest research, published this week in the journal Nature Chemistry. The NO2 captured by the metal-organic framework can be converted easily into nitric acid, which is used to make fertilizer, rocket propellant, nylon and more. Metal-organic frameworks are metal compounds with three-dimensional lattice structures featuring nano-sized pores. The new framework is called MFM-520, and scientists characterized the shape and size of of its internal pores -- the pockets where NO2 gas bec...
Geologists locate source of chemical signature in ancient volcanic rocks

Geologists locate source of chemical signature in ancient volcanic rocks

Science
Oct. 28 (UPI) -- Geologists have linked ancient volcanic activity with a unique geochemical signature measured in rock samples recovered from the coast of Greece. According to a new study published this week in the journal Nature Geoscience, an ancient ring of explosive arc volcanoes, which erupted some 45 million years ago, accounts for the highly oxidized rocks found along the coast of Greece. Researchers hypothesized that fluids from subducted oceanic rocks can explain the oxidation found in rocks formed by the arc volcanoes. To test their hypothesis, scientists went looking for the fluid source's geochemical signature in ancient subducted oceanic crust located on the Greek island of Sifnos. Oxidizing fluids influence the iron isotope composition found large garnet crystals, and becau...
Hubble, Spitzer telescopes conduct chemical survey of mid-size exoplanet

Hubble, Spitzer telescopes conduct chemical survey of mid-size exoplanet

Science
July 2 (UPI) -- For the first time, scientists, with the help of a pair of NASA space telescopes, have identified the chemical signature of the atmosphere surrounding a mid-sized exoplanet. In size, mass and composition, Gliese 3470 b is like a cross between Earth and Neptune -- a rocky core surrounded by a thick layer of gas. The exoplanet weighs 12.6 Earth masses. Neptune by comparison, weighs 17 Earth masses. Mid-sized planets like Gliese 3470 b are common in other planetary systems, but are absent in our own solar system. Despite their ubiquity, researchers have been unable to confirm the chemical composition of a mini-Neptune exoplanet. By characterizing the makeup of Gliese 3470 b's atmosphere, scientists may be able to determine how medium-sized planets form. "This is a big disco...