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Tag: chemicals

Chemicals in food, clothing, cosmetics increase ADHD risk in children, study finds

Chemicals in food, clothing, cosmetics increase ADHD risk in children, study finds

Health
Aug. 28 (UPI) -- Exposure to certain chemicals commonly found in cosmetics and processed foods increases a child's risk for developing ADHD-like behaviors by more than 30%, according to a study published Friday by JAMA Network Open. For every two-fold rise in concentrations of chemicals called phthalates, as measured by urinalysis, a child is 34% more likely to shows signs of the neurobehavioral disorder, the data showed. Advertisement And for every two-fold increase in urine concentrations of dichlorophenols, the risk grows by 15%, the researchers said. Phthalates are used in plastics and are often found in cosmetics, lubricants, personal-care products, medical devices, detergents, packaging, children's toys, pharmaceuticals, food products and clothing, while dichlorophenols can be found...
Bangladesh’s water teeming with drugs, chemicals, study says

Bangladesh’s water teeming with drugs, chemicals, study says

Science
April 10 (UPI) -- Water sampling data suggests the canals, lakes, ponds, rivers and surface waters of Bangladesh host alarmingly high levels of toxic chemicals, antibiotics and other drugs. The proliferation of antibiotics in the environment has been linked with the prevalence of antibiotic-resistance among disease-causing microorganisms, including bacteria, viruses and parasites. In Bangladesh, there is little to no regulation of antimicrobial drug use, and large amounts of antibiotics are used in healthcare and agricultural production. As well, the lack of quality wastewater management makes Bangladesh's water especially vulnerable to spikes in antibiotic residues. For these reasons, India's eastern neighbor is especially vulnerable to the emergence and spread of anti-microbial resista...
CDC study to track dangerous ‘forever chemicals’ in drinking water

CDC study to track dangerous ‘forever chemicals’ in drinking water

Health
Sept. 27 (UPI) -- The Centers For Disease Control and Prevention announced a new multi-site study this week that will investigate the health effects of drinking water contaminated with per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS. The new study -- the first to examine multiple sites of PFAS contamination nationwide -- was authorized by the National Defense Authorization Acts of 2018 and 2019 to provide information to communities about the health effects of PFAS exposure. The CDC will award initial grants totaling $ 7 million to begin the study, with a goal of understanding the relationship between PFAS exposure and health outcomes in differing populations. The study will recruit at least 2,000 children ages 4 to 17, and 6,000 adults over age 18, who have been exposed to PFAS-contaminated...
Netherlands warns of toxic chemicals after containers tossed from cargo ship

Netherlands warns of toxic chemicals after containers tossed from cargo ship

World
Jan. 3 (UPI) -- A Panama-registered cargo ship lost some 270 containers during a storm in the North Sea this week, including three carrying toxic chemicals. The ship, the MSC Zoe, was en route to Bremerhaven, Germany, on Wednesday when it encountered the bad weather, identified locally as Storm Zeetje. The vessel was near the German island of Borkum at the time, and the tide carried some of the containers toward the southwest, the BBC reported. Some of the cargo washed up on islands off the northern Dutch coast, including toys, televisions, shoes, bags, chairs, plastic cups and other items. Officials were worried about three containers carrying toxic substances, including one with bags of peroxide powder, one of which washed ashore on the island of Schiermonnikoog. Officials warned reside...
Chemicals used in Deepwater Horizon spill were ineffective, study says

Chemicals used in Deepwater Horizon spill were ineffective, study says

Science
Nov. 1 (UPI) -- The chemical dispersants used to clean up oil after the Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010 were ineffective and unneeded, a new study says. Researchers report in a study published this week that dispersants used in the largest oil spill in U.S. history -- 210 million gallons of oil poured into the Gulf over 87 days after a BP oil rig exploded -- played no role in its clean up. BP injected 3,000 tons of a subsea dispersant called Corexit to push back the spread of oil and dissolve its particles. Instead, the researchers report, the dispersant was rendered ineffective due to the depth of the oil. And according to the study, the Corexit may have suppressed the growth of oil degrading sea bacteria, in addition to making the oil itself more toxic. "The resul...