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Tag: Chemistry

Army researchers improve battery safety with new cathode chemistry

Army researchers improve battery safety with new cathode chemistry

Science
May 10 (UPI) -- Scientists with the U.S. Army have developed a new type of cathode chemistry that makes batteries safer and more efficient. Currently, soldiers must regularly carry batteries weighing between 15 and 20 pounds. But thanks to a new type of cathode and electrolyte, soldiers could soon be carrying safer and more efficient batteries weighing half as much. Army researchers were able to boost lithium-ion battery energy density by using a totally aqueous electrolyte. The electrolyte is free of transition metal and boasts high capacity energy storage. "Such a high energy, safe and potentially flexible new battery will likely give the Soldiers what they need on the battlefield: reliable high energy source with robust tolerance against abuse," Kang Xu, senior scientist at the U.S. Ar...
Helpline to tackle bullying in chemistry

Helpline to tackle bullying in chemistry

Science
Bullying and harassment is such a problem in the world of chemistry that a dedicated helpline is being set up for victims, a scientific body says.The Royal Society of Chemistry says people were being denied opportunities because of "a culture of secrecy" and the 'unchecked power of managers'.The research showed both men and women have been bullied and harassed by colleagues.But it was mostly women who were discriminated against.It's hoped the helpline will increase the number of women chemists.'Rock stars'Professor Rachel O'Reilly is now Head of the Chemistry School at the University of Birmingham.But, in previous roles, she says she's "had issues or witnessed others" facing discrimination."I've been called 'little woman' a lot." ...
Meteorite's blue crystals offer insights into young sun's chemistry

Meteorite's blue crystals offer insights into young sun's chemistry

Science
July 30 (UPI) -- Scientists have found minerals old enough to shed light on the composition and behavior of the sun shortly after its birth, 4.6 billion years ago. The composition of the ancient blue hibonite crystals found inside the remnants of a 4.5 billion-year-old meteorite suggest the sun was spewing a plethora of high-energy particles during its earliest years. "The sun was very active in its early life -- it had more eruptions and gave off a more intense stream of charged particles," Philipp Heck, a curator at the Field Museum and a professor at the University of Chicago, said in a news release. Just as the sun was born, the newborn star was surrounded by a thick, swirling circumstellar disk of gas and dust. The disk hosted temperatures upwards of 2,700 degrees Fahrenheit. As the ...
Our chemistry was magic: Angie's tribute to 'Dirty' Den

Our chemistry was magic: Angie's tribute to 'Dirty' Den

Entertainment
Anita Dobson has paid tribute to her EastEnders co-star Leslie Grantham who died aged 71. Dobson who played Angie Watts - the wife of 'Dirty' Den - in the TV soap, described Grantham as the "archetypal charming rogue" and spoke of their "magic" chemistry on the show.His representative announced on Friday that the actor had died after a long battle with cancer.Best known for his role in the BBC soap, he played Albert Square's notorious villain 'Dirty' Den from 1985 to 1989.Dobson told BBC News: "He was a good-looking guy, he was a charmer, he was funny, he was a good actor. And he was fun to be around, we were good mates."But I think there's always that kind of look about him that you just didn't know what he was going to do next, and that was his ace in the hole, there was ...