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12 children among 42 dead in weapons depot blast

12 children among 42 dead in weapons depot blast

World
An explosion at a weapons depot in Syria has killed at least 39 civilians including a dozen children, a monitoring group has said. Three militants were also killed, according to the British-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights (SOHR).Rescue workers used bulldozers to remove rubble and get people out of two damaged buildings.Five people were pulled out alive.One of the buildings was scorched black after a fire followed the explosion.White Helmet rescue workers attempted to lift part of the floor of one of the buildings with a crane.SOHR said the weapons depot was housed in a residential building in the northwestern town of Sarmada, in Idlib province.Its head, Rami Abdel Rahman, said the cause of the blast was "not yet clear", and that most of those killed were family ...
Doctors continue to link screen time to poor health in children

Doctors continue to link screen time to poor health in children

Health
According to a new scientific advisory statement release by the American Heart Association, time spent on "screens" (computers, phones, tablets, video games, television and other outlets) is associated with increased hours of inactivity in children and teens, which has long been associated with poor cardiovascular health and obesity. "The nature of screen time has dramatically changed – while watching television has gone down, overall screen time has gone up. We wanted to see how that would influence patterns of sedentary behavior. Even though we have new screen-based recreational devices now, we are just as sedentary," Tracie Barnett, PhD, an epidemiologist specializing in pediatric obesity and a lead author of the advisory, told ABC News. What age spends the most time on screens...
Study: Antibiotics may increase type 1 diabetes risk in children

Study: Antibiotics may increase type 1 diabetes risk in children

Health
July 24 (UPI) -- The increased risk of type 1 diabetes has been associated with one course of antibiotics in childhood, according to a study with mice. Previously, researchers at New York University School of Medicine had found that exposure to multiple courses of antibiotics accelerated the disease's onset. But their current findings, which were published Tuesday in eLife, found one single course significantly boosted the risk and severity. "Our findings confirm earlier work showing that antibiotics can increase risk for type 1 diabetes," lead study author Dr. Xuesong Zhang, an assistant professor of medicine at NYU School of Medicine, said in a press release. "Even a single early-life course may perturb the intestinal microbiome in ways that lead to long-term consequences in the intest...
Civil service gaffe as parents told to shoot rabid children

Civil service gaffe as parents told to shoot rabid children

Technology
The civil service made an eye-popping error after accidentally publishing a satirical poster encouraging parents to shoot their children if they suspect they have contracted rabies. The current issue of Civil Service Quarterly features the poster - produced by the fictional council of Scarfolk - on page 20.The fictional town of Scarfolk was created by writer and designer Richard Littler as "a dystopian satire of the 1970s that somehow leaks into and reflects on current affairs". Wow. This has made my week. This is from the government's *own* publication about the history of government communications. They mistakenly included a Scarfolk poster which encourages the killing of children. Clearly, nobody thought it was too extreme. (via @CraigHeap...
Parents desperate to help children they believe have rare, controversial disorder

Parents desperate to help children they believe have rare, controversial disorder

Health
Vanessa Baier's 4-year-old daughter Alexia was in full-on crisis. "I just kept thinking, 'What's going on with my child?'" Vanessa Baier told "20/20" while fighting back tears. Alexia had been breaking out into erratic, explosive behavior that would appear completely out of left field. "It was just swings that were very dramatic and uncalled for, for the situation," her father, Brian Baier, told "20/20." "There have been times where [her tantrum] was an hour and a half, two hours," Vanessa Baier said. Alexia, now 8, wasn't always so volatile. Her mother, a special-needs teacher; her father, an accountant; and their oldest daughter, Kyla, had all welcomed a very typical baby girl to their loving home outside Chicago. "She had such a fun personality. She was always laughing, smiling...