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Tag: climate

Watch billions of tons of ice collapse at once: Climate change impact on Greenland

Watch billions of tons of ice collapse at once: Climate change impact on Greenland

World
Perched on a cliff above Greenland’s Helheim glacier, I tried calling my wife in New York on a satellite phone. Before I could leave a message, an explosion broke the arctic silence. More explosions followed. I ran across a muddy tundra to a video camera on a tripod overlooking the glacier and ripped off the trash bag I had used to protect it. I hit record as fast as I could focus. The popping sounds morphed into a low rumble. Over the next half hour, the ice broke apart and a four-mile wide chunk tumbled into the sea in a process called calving - one rarely witnessed on this scale. As a Reuters photographer, I have captured erupting volcanoes, the aftermath of hurricanes and tornadoes, and war, but I have never felt so small. It was a poignant end to a months-long project e...
Coastal wetlands must migrate inland to survive climate change

Coastal wetlands must migrate inland to survive climate change

Science
Sept. 12 (UPI) -- If coastal wetlands are to survive climate change -- and continue to provide a bounty of ecological benefits -- they most move inland, according to a new study. Previous studies have suggested many coastal wetlands are likely to be wiped out by encroaching salt water as global warming accelerates sea level rise. But new analysis suggests many marshes and mangroves could be saved if they were able to move farther inland. That's good news, as wetlands help absorb excess CO2 and serve as a vital buffer against damaging storms and flooding. Some studies have shown wetlands save hundreds of lives and millions of dollars. To better understand the fates of coastal wetlands, an international team of scientists collected and analyzed data from the around the world. Researchers lo...
Study to help scientists predict climate change's impact on biodiversity

Study to help scientists predict climate change's impact on biodiversity

Science
Aug. 30 (UPI) -- A new study suggests a species ability to survive and adapt to climate change depends on the speed at which climate conditions shift. The climate has been changing for hundreds of millions of years. Along the way, plant and animal communities have adjusted and persevered. But anthropogenic climate change is different, it's happening at greater speeds and on a greater magnitude. To better understand how plants and animals will respond in the future, scientists need to more accurately characterize how climate change has impacted biodiversity in the past. A new survey of climate change throughout Earth's history suggests most plants and animals have shown the ability to move and adapt to climate change. However, the latest findings -- detailed this week in the journal Trend...
Climate change: 'Hothouse Earth' risks even if CO2 emissions slashed

Climate change: 'Hothouse Earth' risks even if CO2 emissions slashed

World
It may sound like the title of a low budget sci-fi movie, but for planetary scientists, "Hothouse Earth" is a deadly serious concept.Researchers believe we could soon cross a threshold leading to boiling hot temperatures and towering seas in the centuries to come.Even if countries succeed in meeting their CO2 targets, we could still lurch on to this "irreversible pathway". Their study shows it could happen if global temperatures rise by 2 deg C.An international team of climate researchers, writing in the journal, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, says the warming expected in the next few decades could turn some of the Earth's natural forces - that currently protect us - into our enemies. Each year the Earth's forests, oceans and land soak u...
Climate change driven by humans made heatwave 'twice as likely'

Climate change driven by humans made heatwave 'twice as likely'

Science
Climate change resulting from human activities made the current Europe-wide heatwave more than twice as likely to occur, say scientistsResearchers compared the current high temperatures with historical records from seven weather stations, in different parts of Europe.Their preliminary report found that the "signal of climate change is unambiguous," in this summer's heat.They also say the scale of the heatwave in the Arctic is unprecedented.The scale and breadth of the current heat being experienced across Europe has prompted many questions about the influence of global warming on extreme events. To try and see if there is a connection, researchers looked at data from seven weather stations, in Finland, Denmark, Ireland, the Nethe...