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Tag: CNBC

Meet the financial advisor ranked No. 1 two years in a row by CNBC

Finance
David Rea in Chobe National Park in Botswana.Source: David ReaFor two years in a row, something hasn't changed on CNBC's ranking of the top 100 financial advisors in the U.S.: Salem Investment Counselors has come in at No. 1.CNBC spoke recently with Salem's president, David Rea, about why he believes his firm has been ranked so highly – twice.Salem Investment Counselors provides comprehensive financial planning and investment management to its clients, most of whom have a net worth of $ 500,000 or more. The Winston-Salem, North Carolina-based firm has more than $ 1.7 billion in assets under management and has been in business since 1979.Rea, whose mother was a housekeeper and father worked in the steel mills in Indiana, has been serving some of his clients for close to four decades now, ...

FA 100: CNBC ranks the top-rated financial advisory firms of 2020

Finance
Finding the right financial advisor to help with your financial needs and goals can be complicated.There are so many things to consider. Many advisors use a big assets-under-management figure as a selling-point when marketing themselves to investors. However, AUM isn’t the whole story when a potential client is determining which firm is right for them.To be sure, every financial advisor has his or her own area of expertise. Each will have a different investment strategy and planning approach and offer various services, including tax and insurance planning, debt management, retirement planning, saving for education and charitable giving.A financial advisor can play a major role in helping clients grow and protect their wealth. The key is to find an advisor you trust, and it’s important to m...
Despite volatility, wealthy investors plan no money moves: CNBC survey

Despite volatility, wealthy investors plan no money moves: CNBC survey

Finance
It's hard to avoid the allure of panicky headlines when the Dow is below 23,000 and the Nasdaq has entered a bear market, but for every "record" stampede of investors into bonds and sudden flood of money into cash tracked by a Wall Street firm, there's a wealthy American making a money move that might seem even more shocking: not doing anything. The latest CNBC Millionaire Survey shows that even as volatility spiked in the period since September, wealthy Americans are not making major changes to asset-allocation models. Investors with at least $ 1 million in investable assets surveyed by CNBC in mid-November — when volatility was already high — said th...