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1 in 5 college students are parents. Schools could be doing more to help them

1 in 5 college students are parents. Schools could be doing more to help them

Finance
Bronsyn Foster's 8-year-old son wondered why his mother was still in school."He said, 'Why couldn't you just finish school before you had me?'" said Foster, now 48. "It's hard for a little kid to understand why you can't be around more often."Yet he was one of the main reasons she was, at nearly 40-years-old, back in the classroom. After the single mother was laid off from her job as a graphic designer at a newspaper during the Great Recession, her path forward was a giant question mark. She had dropped out of college years before. And so, in 2009, she enrolled at the University of Washington to become a speech language pathologist."I was worried if I didn't finish my degree, I'd never have a job that paid enough to take care of the both of us," Foster said.Bronsyn Foster and her son at a ...
Four ways for college students to control their health-care costs

Four ways for college students to control their health-care costs

Finance
PeopleImages | DigitalVision | Getty ImagesStudents and their families are grappling with the cost of higher education, but here's one expense that might be a surprise: health care.The default option for many college students — especially if they're under age 26 — might be to remain on Mom and Dad's insurance, yet that may come with additional costs.For starters, will a parent's plan adequately cover a college student if he or she attends school out of state and has only out-of-network providers available? "If it's all out of network, it might be worth looking at other alternatives," said Scott Frank, a certified financial planner and founder of Stone Steps Financial in Encinitas, California.Before making changes to your medical coverage, assess your available options based on the monthly
Kids are increasingly worried about paying for college

Kids are increasingly worried about paying for college

Finance
Parents, of course, worry about paying for college. Increasingly, their children share that concern.Over the last decade, tuition and fees jumped 44% at four-year, private colleges and by 55% at public four-year schools. As a result, student debt has reached record proportions, with $ 1.6 trillion in loans outstanding.Now, high school students are more cost-conscious than ever when it comes to choosing a school, according to the College Savings Foundation's 10th annual "How Youth Plan to Fund College" survey.More from Personal Finance: Costs have jumped 55% in a decade at public collegesThe best schools for financial aid The latest victims of the student debt crisis — parentsThe vast majority — 83% — said affordability was a factor in deciding which college to attend, up from 75% last yea
As a financial advisor shortage looms, college programs look to help fill the talent gap

As a financial advisor shortage looms, college programs look to help fill the talent gap

Finance
When Julie Penwell graduates from Central Washington University this spring, she plans to pursue the career she has been dreaming about since she was 15-years-old — that of a personal financial planner.Penwell decided to pursue the profession after a high school financial planning class gave her what she describes as "base level financial literacy" and an insatiable desire to learn more.Now, she is studying for the exam to become a certified financial planner, while working two jobs and serving as the president of her school's Personal Financial Planning Club.Julie Penwell, 21, plans to pursue a career in financial planning after she graduates from Central Washington University this spring.Alex Horning, ABH Studios "You get to work with people and help them meet their goals," Penwell said
Transferring to your dream college? Ask these 3 questions first

Transferring to your dream college? Ask these 3 questions first

Finance
Hero Images | Getty ImagesIf your high-school senior didn't make the cut at his dream college this spring, then a transfer might be in the cards.Just make sure you don't botch it.On average, colleges offered admission to 62% of transfer applicants in fall of 2017, according to the National Association for College Admission Counseling.In comparison, they offered a seat to an average of 65% of first-time freshmen, the association found.There are multiple reasons why students might want to make a switch from one school to the next. Perhaps they didn't find the appropriate fit at their first institution. "It's very common for a college freshman to question whether he or she should be at that particular college," said Eric Greenberg, president of Greenberg Educational Group in New York. "The qu...