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Tag: Congress

Migrant children: US battle moves to Congress

Migrant children: US battle moves to Congress

World
Media playback is unsupported on your device The US political battle over migrant children separated from parents has shifted to Congress, after Donald Trump signed an order ending the practice.The House of Representatives will vote on broader immigration bills which fund President Trump's proposed border wall and reduce legal migration.But Democrats oppose them and it is uncertain that they will pass.Mr Trump reversed his policy after a public outcry at home and globally over the policy, widely seen as inhumane. The order calls for the families to be detained together while their cases are considered.More on child migrants crisisBut the fate of families already separated by the policy is not clear.US immigration officials say 2,342 children w...
Macron attacks nationalism in speech to US Congress

Macron attacks nationalism in speech to US Congress

World
Media playback is unsupported on your deviceFrench President Emmanuel Macron has used his speech to the joint houses of the US Congress to denounce nationalism and isolationism.Mr Macron said such policies were a threat to global prosperity.The speech was widely interpreted as a thinly veiled attack on President Donald Trump's America First agenda.Mr Macron also raised differences on global trade, Iran and the environment, seemingly in contrast to the warm bonhomie of his visit so far.The French president was given a three-minute standing ovation as he took his place in the chamber for his speech.Media playback is unsupported on your deviceHe hailed the "unbreakable bonds" of the US and France, forged in "liberty, tolerance and equal rights".What does a Trump-Macron bromance mean for the w...
Facebook CEO didn't have all the answers for Congress

Facebook CEO didn't have all the answers for Congress

Technology
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg often came across as one of the smartest people in the room as he jousted with U.S. lawmakers demanding to know how and why his company peers into the lives of its 2.2 billion users. But while some questions were elementary, others left Zuckerberg unable to offer clear explanations or specific answers. A series of tough inquiries about how much personal information Facebook vacuums up on and off its social network seemed particularly vexing for Zuckerberg, who couldn't quantify it. He was vague about whether Facebook was a monopoly and whether it would offer an ad-free option, as well as about how the company could offer the same level of privacy protection to users around the world. Zuckerberg squirmed when pressed about a 2011 agreement with the Federal Trad...
Facebook reveals Mark Zuckerberg's US Congress testimony

Facebook reveals Mark Zuckerberg's US Congress testimony

Business
Mark Zuckerberg has revealed his planned testimony to the US Congress, ahead of answering questions during a two day hearing about data privacy.The Facebook founder will speak about the Cambridge Analytica data scandal, Russian election interference and what the company is doing to prevent future incidents.He will say the firm's new investment in security will affect its profits."Protecting our community is more important," he adds.On the subject of users' data, he will say that every app that had access to a large amount of Facebook data prior to 2014 will be investigated. He said privacy controls had been made easier to understand.Mr Zuckerberg also admits that Facebook was slow to spot Russian meddling.Read Mark Zuckerberg's full statement hereOver a two year period, 126 million people ...
US government shuts down as Congress fails to vote on budget

US government shuts down as Congress fails to vote on budget

World
The US government has officially shut down for the second time this year because Congress failed to meet a deadline to vote on a new budget.Senators struggled with last-minute objections from Republican Rand Paul, but have now passed the bill, which has gone to the House for its vote.Federal funding for government services expired at midnight (05:00 GMT).The 600-page plan proposes an increase in spending, by about $ 300bn (£215bn), on defence and domestic services.If the plan is passed in the House of Representatives and signed by the president in the next few hours, the shutdown could be rescinded before the US working day begins on Friday. But it is not clear how the House will vote, and how public services would be affected on Friday if the shutdown were to continue.What does a shutdown