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Humans stored bone marrow for delayed consumption 400,000 years ago

Humans stored bone marrow for delayed consumption 400,000 years ago

Science
Oct. 11 (UPI) -- Paleolithic humans stored animal bones for as long as two months before eating the marrow. The discovery -- published this week in the journal Scientific Advances -- suggests early humans were practicing food storage and delayed consumption as early as 400,000 years ago. The evidence was recovered in Qesem Cave, a Lower Paleolithic archeological site located outside of Tel Aviv, Israel. "Bone marrow constitutes a significant source of nutrition and as such was long featured in the prehistoric diet," Ran Barkai, a professor of archaeology at Tel Aviv University, said in a news release. "Until now, evidence has pointed to immediate consumption of marrow following the procurement and removal of soft tissues. In our paper, we present evidence of storage and delayed consumpti...
Earliest direct evidence of milk consumption

Earliest direct evidence of milk consumption

Science
Scientists have discovered the earliest direct evidence of milk consumption by humans.The team identified milk protein entombed in dental plaque on the teeth of prehistoric farmers from Britain.It shows that humans were consuming dairy products as early as 6,000 years ago - despite being lactose intolerant.This could suggest they processed the raw milk into cheese, yoghurt or some other fermented product.This would have reduced its lactose content, making it more palatable.The team members scraped samples of plaque off the teeth, separated the different components within it and analysed them using mass spectrometry.They detected a milk protein called beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) in the tartar of seven individuals spanning early to mi...
ICICI Pru Mutual Fund launches Bharat Consumption Scheme

ICICI Pru Mutual Fund launches Bharat Consumption Scheme

Finance
ICICI Prudential AMC announced launched the ICICI Prudential Bharat Consumption Scheme. The Scheme aims to benefit from the Indian consumption story, considered as one of the fastest growing consumption markets globally. The benchmark for the Scheme is Nifty India Consumption Index and will be managed by Rajat Chandak and Dharmesh Kakkad. The overseas investments of the scheme will be managed by Priyanka Khandelwal. "Globally, it has been observed that the moment a country’s per capita GDP crosses $ 2,000*, there is a disproportionate rise in discretionary spending and India is poised to cross this milestone in 2019-20,” Nimesh Shah, MD & CEO, ICICI Prudential AMC, said on the launch of the scheme. “With the largest millennial population globally, India offers a growt...
International worries as China's consumption and economy slows

International worries as China's consumption and economy slows

Business
Picture China's economy and you might be thinking of massive factories, gigantic airports or train stations built from scratch in 24 hours. For another view, you could follow Xu Liqiang as he threads the streets of Beijing in a beaten-up tuk-tuk (motorised rickshaw).Xu is 21 years old and a "kuaidi" (express delivery) driver. Each day 100 million packages are delivered in China and they're delivered by people like him. It's part of a boom in Chinese consumption that has driven growth in global GDP over the last decade.But today, work is slow. "After Double Eleven [an online shopping festival], the packages have been getting less and less with time," he tells me.Xu lives in a dormitory provided by his employer with three other kuaidi drivers. He moved to Beijing from Shanxi ...
WWF report: Mass wildlife loss caused by human consumption

WWF report: Mass wildlife loss caused by human consumption

Science
Media playback is unsupported on your device "Exploding human consumption" has caused a massive drop in global wildlife populations in recent decades, the WWF conservation group says.In a report, the charity says losses in vertebrate species - mammals, fish, birds, amphibians and reptiles - averaged 60% between 1970 and 2014."Earth is losing biodiversity at a rate seen only during mass extinctions," the WWF's Living Planet Report adds.It urges policy makers to set new targets for sustainable development.The Living Planet Report, published every two years, aims to assess the state of the world's wildlife.The 2018 edition says only a quarter of the world's land area is now free from the impact of human activity and the proportion will have falle...