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Tag: control

General Dynamics contracted for missile control systems for U.S., U.K.

General Dynamics contracted for missile control systems for U.S., U.K.

Business
Dec. 27 (UPI) -- General Dynamics Mission Systems has been awarded a $ 28 million contract for sustainment of weapons systems aboard U.S. and U.K. nuclear submarines. The contract, announced Wednesday by the Department of Defense, covers work on the fire control systems on both nation's submarines, as well as the attack weapon control system on U.S. subs. Additionally, the contract covers missile fire control for both the U.S. Columbia-class and U.K. Dreadnought-class common missile compartment program development and strategic weapon interface simulator. Work on the contract will mostly be performed in Pittsfield, Mass., and is expected to finished by Sept. 30, 2023. Let's block ads! (Why?) Business News - UPI.com
Here are 5 ways to control your stress during a volatile market

Here are 5 ways to control your stress during a volatile market

Finance
While I can't give you any investment advice or help you ignore the current market conditions, I can teach you how to manage stress so that "volatile" describes the market and not your mindset. Emotions can help influence decision-making, but when it comes to considering investment decisions in a volatile market, getting stressed out may point your investments in the wrong direction. The high level of stress in today's financial market is not only threatening retirement accounts and portfolios, it's depleting an investor's greatest resource: brain power. ...
Take these steps to control your (over)reaction in the face of market volatility

Take these steps to control your (over)reaction in the face of market volatility

Finance
Gyrating markets, rising rates and significant market volatility will always create anxiety for investors and leave them with a bad, sinking feeling. Those big swings typically cause investors great concern, no matter the rise or fall. But what is the root of the anxiety? Behavioral science suggests that humans are "uncertainty reduction" machines. That's one of the reasons why we can get a reward for putting money at risk in the markets ... that is, if we stay invested. Which brings us to the market volatility in the fourth quarter of the year. Headlines relating to the Dow "plunging" more than 800 points back on Oct.10 &mda...
France aims to control Google content globally

France aims to control Google content globally

Technology
France is headed to the European Court of Justice to establish whether it can force companies such as Google to de-list search results globally. France's data regulator is seeking clarification on whether material removed under the "right to be forgotten" (RTBF) law should only be removed within France or if it should be de-listed on every Google domain.RTBF was established in 2014 when a man called Mario Costeja complained that searching for his name on Google returned out-of-date material about an unsettled debt and didn't reveal that his debt was settled.He won his case, and now the RTBF allows ordinary people to demand that Google amends its search results and de-lists links to "inadequate, irrelevant or [...] excessive" information. Although the material itself remains...
Physicists control molecule for a millionth of a billionth of a second

Physicists control molecule for a millionth of a billionth of a second

Science
Sept. 7 (UPI) -- Using a microscope and its electrical current, physicists have found a way to manipulate and control a single molecule. The breakthrough happened by accident. In the lab, scientists were observing a basic chemical reaction under an electron microscope. Normally, when the current of the microscope is increased, the reaction happens faster. This time, it didn't. "This was data from an utterly standard experiment we were doing because we thought we had exhausted all the interesting stuff -- this was just a final check," Kristina Rusimova, physicist at the University of Bath, said in a news release. "But my data looked 'wrong' -- all the graphs were supposed to go up and mine went down." Scientists at Bath spent months trying to explain the anomaly. After repeating their exp...