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Tag: cool

Older bees influence younger bees to fan wings, cool hive

Older bees influence younger bees to fan wings, cool hive

Science
Aug. 3 (UPI) -- To keep bee hives cool, honey bees fan their wings to promote circulation. New research suggests the behavior is socially influenced. Previous research showed groups of bees are more likely to fan their wings. The newest study revealed the individual interactions that promote group behavior. Observations showed older, more experienced worker bees encourage younger nurse bees to fan their wings. Scientists found older bees had the greatest influence on younger bees when they were the first to fan in a group. "The older workers are definitely influencing the younger nurse bees," researcher Rachael Kaspar said in a news release. "I was interested in how different age groups socially interacted, what are the variances between age groups and how are they interacting to have a p...
Forget Summer Fridays. These companies offer cool summer perks

Forget Summer Fridays. These companies offer cool summer perks

Finance
Another strong jobs report. Here's why unemployment went up Summer Fridays are nothing new. And in a tight job market where employers are struggling to find workers, companies are getting more creative with the seasonal perks they offer in order to stand out from their competitors. Around 72% of companies that increased benefits cited worker retention as the reason, while 58% wanted to attract new talent, according to the 2018 employee benefits survey from the Society for Human Resource Management. "Every single person we make an offer to has another offer," said Michelle Wagner, senior vice president of people operations at Evernote. "People really care about how and where they work — that matters to them. That puts more pressure on us to hire well and create ...
New US weather satellite can't keep cool, could hurt photos

New US weather satellite can't keep cool, could hurt photos

Technology
The nation's newest weather satellite, launched less than three months ago, has a serious cooling problem that could affect the quality of its pictures. The trouble is with the GOES-17 satellite's premier instrument for taking images of hurricanes, wildfires, volcanic eruptions and other natural calamities, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Wednesday. The imager's infrared sensors aren't getting properly cooled. Experts are scrambling to understand what went wrong and how to fix it. Officials expect it will take at least a few months to figure out. "As you can imagine, doing this remotely from 22,000 miles below only looking at the on-orbit data is a challenge," said Steve Volz, head of NOAA's satellite and information service. NOAA stresses that three other GOES s...