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Tag: cooling

Cave sediments suggest global cooling 13K years ago not caused by asteroid

Cave sediments suggest global cooling 13K years ago not caused by asteroid

Science
July 31 (UPI) -- Geochemical signatures found in sediments recovered from a Texas cave suggest the Younger Dryas, a period of global cooling that occurred 13,000 years ago, was caused by a series of Earth-based processes, not an extraterrestrial impact. Previously, scientists in search of an explanation for the Younger Dryas have pointed to spikes in several rare earth metals as evidence that an asteroid or comet impact triggered the cooling. Advertisement Most recently, when researchers looked at the sedimentary evidence, they found these spikes in rare earth metals actually featured relatively low concentrations of iridium, ruthenium, platinum, palladium and rhenium -- levels inconsistent with an extraterrestrial impact event. "The isotopic signatures and concentrations can be explained...
Parts of the ocean are still cooling, study suggests

Parts of the ocean are still cooling, study suggests

Science
Jan. 4 (UPI) -- Most of the world's oceans are responding to global warming, but new research suggests there are still pockets of the deep ocean where ancient cooling processes continue to play out. Scientists at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and Harvard University determined the deep Pacific Ocean is still responding to the 16th century's Little Ice Age. "Climate varies across all timescales," Peter Huybers, professor of earth and planetary sciences at Harvard, said in a news release. "Some regional warming and cooling patterns, like the Little Ice Age and the Medieval Warm Period, are well known. Our goal was to develop a model of how the interior properties of the ocean respond to changes in surface climate." The model showed that ancient cooling likely persists in deeply in...
Climate change: Low cost, low energy cooling system shows promise

Climate change: Low cost, low energy cooling system shows promise

Science
Researchers in the US have scaled up a new low-cost system that could provide efficient cooling for homes while using very little electricity.The team has developed a roof-top sized array, built from a highly reflective material made from glass and polymers.In tests, the system kept water around 10C cooler than the ambient air when exposed to midday sunlight in summer. The approach could also be scaled up to cool power stations and data centres.The system is based around what's termed a cooling meta-material, which is essentially an engineered film not found in nature. Last year, researchers at CU Boulder in the US published research on the extraordinary properties of the new film, which reflects back almost all incoming light fr...
Deep fat fryers may help form cooling clouds

Deep fat fryers may help form cooling clouds

Science
Media playback is unsupported on your deviceFatty acids released into the air from cooking may contribute to the formation of clouds that cool the climate, say scientists.Fatty acid molecules comprise about 10% of fine particulates over London, and such particles help seed clouds.But researchers dismiss the idea that cooking fats could be used as a geo-engineering tool to reduce warming.Instead, the research is designed to help reduce uncertainties about the role of cooking fats on climate.Researchers believe the fatty molecules arrange themselves into complex 3-D structures in atmospheric droplets.These aerosols persist for longer than normal and can seed the formation of clouds which experts say can have a cooling effect on the climate.The authors say the study will shed new light on the...
Artificially cooling Earth is a 'highly risky strategy,' researchers warn

Artificially cooling Earth is a 'highly risky strategy,' researchers warn

Science
Nov. 14 (UPI) -- Some scientists and policy officials have proposed artificial cooling as a solution to global warming. But a new study suggests any such efforts would present serious risks.One of the most popular forms of geoengineering is the manipulation of clouds, using aerosols to promote cloud formation and cloud brightening. Higher concentrations of clouds -- and brighter clouds -- can help reflect sunlight and reduce warming.The introduction of large amounts of aerosols into the atmosphere by volcanic eruptions has in the past triggered periods of global cooling.But new analysis at the University of Exeter showed such geoengineering efforts could have unintended consequences. An influx of aerosols in the atmosphere in the Northern Hemisphere, for example, would be likely to encoura...