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Anthony Joshua next fight: British boxer could face Jarrell Miller in New York in June and NOT Deontay Wilder or Tyson Fury

Anthony Joshua next fight: British boxer could face Jarrell Miller in New York in June and NOT Deontay Wilder or Tyson Fury

Sports
AMERICAN BOY Promoter Eddie Hearn hinted that the Brit will defend his unified heavyweight titles at Madison Square Garden this summer Promoter Eddie Hearn has dropped a massive hint suggesting Anthony Joshua’s next opponent will be Jarrell ‘Big Baby’ Miller. With several top contenders complaining of being low-balled by the heavyweight champion’s team, it seems a fight against the undefeated American beckons for Joshua. Eddie Hearn is keen to turn Joshua into a global superstar The unified world heavyweight champion has not fought since blasting out Alexander Povetkin in September at Wembley. Although a unification fight with Deontay Wilder was being lined up for April 13 at the 90,000-seater stadium, the American is ...
Yellowstone's forests could be grassland in just a few decades

Yellowstone's forests could be grassland in just a few decades

Science
Jan. 18 (UPI) -- The combination of warming, drought and wildfire could turn Yellowstone's forests into grassland by the middle of the century, scientists warn. Wildfires are a normal occurrence in most forests in the American West. Large fires are less common. In Yellowstone, big blazes rip through the park once every 100 to 300 years. Flora and fauna in Yellowstone are adapted to periodic large fires, but they need time to recover and regenerate. But according to a new study, large fires are becoming more common, and hotter, drier conditions are making it more difficult for plant and animal species to repopulate ecosystems scorched by wildfire. As prolonged droughts, extreme heatwaves and bigger fires become the new norm, scientists worry Yellowstone's forests will be grassland in just ...
The way stocks are gliding higher could be a bullish sign for the year

The way stocks are gliding higher could be a bullish sign for the year

Finance
Compared to the rough ride down, stocks have much more quietly and gently recovered more than 13 percent of their losses from the Christmas Eve low. That's good news for bullish investors, who expect that the turbulent Christmas lows marked the bottom of the rout that took the S&P 500 down 20 percent on an intraday basis. The S&P 500 Friday closed out a fourth week of gains and was up 13.6 percent from the Christmas Eve close. "It's a grind higher, but I think that's classic. The market takes the stairs up and elevator down. The elevator was a horror show in December. The market is just grinding its way back," said Ar...
New screening could accurately predict type 1 diabetes risk in babies

New screening could accurately predict type 1 diabetes risk in babies

Health
Jan. 17 (UPI) -- A new screening may forecast type 1 diabetes risk in babies, a new study says. The new risk score known as the T1DGRS2 showed twice the efficiency as existing tests in predicting the chance of babies developing Type 1 diabetes, new findings published Thursday in Diabetes Care. "Prediction of what diseases we might get in the future is an important area, and type 1 diabetes has a strong genetic element that we are now able to measure very well," Richard Oram, a researcher at University of Exeter, said in a press release. "Measurement of the type 1 diabetes genetic risk score could help predict who will develop the condition from early life could help with research into potential early life interventions, and with classifying diabetes correctly at diagnosis." Current type 1...
Jellyfish map could help conservationists protect marine ecosystems

Jellyfish map could help conservationists protect marine ecosystems

Science
Jan. 16 (UPI) -- By analyzing the chemical composition of jellyfish caught across a sizable swath of the Atlantic, scientists can map important differences among an array of marine habitats. The analysis technique could offer important insights to ecologists and conservationists -- a new tool for protecting the health of important fisheries. According to a new study published this week in the journal Methods in Ecology and Evolution, chemical signals measured in jellyfish reflect the chemistry, biology and physical processes unique to the region where they were caught. "The chemical differences detected in the jellyfish are also present in other animals throughout the food chain, like seabirds, seals and fishes," Katie St. John Glew, researcher at the University of Southampton, said in a ...