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Manchester United consider sacking Ole Gunnar Solskjaer and could bring in England boss Gareth Southgate after Euro 2020

Manchester United consider sacking Ole Gunnar Solskjaer and could bring in England boss Gareth Southgate after Euro 2020

Sports
Manchester United will consider sacking under-pressure manager Ole Gunnar Solskjaer this season and Gareth Southgate is understood to be a leading contender to replace him. Solskjaer was given the Old Trafford job permanently in March 2019, however, Man United have been in dreadful form since and are currently experiencing their worst ever Premier League season. AFP or licensors Solskjaer is under increasing pressure The Daily Mail reports that if results don’t improve then the Norwegian will go and England boss Southgate could take over after Euro 2020. The report also claims that Man United want Solskjaer to turn things around but senior sources have quoted the ‘Kenny Dalglish scenario’, when Liverpool got rid of the club legend in 2012 which paved
Coronavirus is getting stronger and infections could rise, China warns

Coronavirus is getting stronger and infections could rise, China warns

World
China has warned the ability of the deadly coronavirus to spread is getting stronger as the number infected globally rose to more than 2,000.The authorities said little is known about the new virus and are unclear on the risks posed by it mutating. National Health Commission Minister Ma Xiaowei said the incubation period for the coronavirus can range from one to 14 days, and is infectious during this time. Image: Multiple departure flights have been cancelled in Wuhan This was not the case with the previous Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) outbreak, which also originated in China and killed nearly 800 people around the world in 2002 and 2003.In response to the mounting crisis, containment efforts, which to date have included t...
Here’s when your tax return could spark interest from the IRS

Here’s when your tax return could spark interest from the IRS

Finance
Just because the IRS is auditing fewer tax returns, don't assume you can dupe the taxman.With much of the agency's systems automated to spot certain discrepancies, and some parts of tax returns typically generating more scrutiny than others, the risk of hearing from the IRS still remains."A lot of this is done by analytics and computers … and the farther you are from the normal range for similar taxpayers, the more likely you are to get a love letter in the mail from the IRS," said CPA Jeffrey Levine, CEO of BluePrint Wealth Alliance in Garden City, New York.FreezeFrameStudio | E+ | Getty ImagesThe IRS will start accepting 2019 returns on Jan. 27 with a continually shrinking budget and reduction in staff, who will handle an estimated 150 million returns.While most people will never face an
The next big thing in ETFs could give a boost to long suffering active investors

The next big thing in ETFs could give a boost to long suffering active investors

Finance
Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on January 10, 2020 in New York City.Kena Betancur | Getty ImagesActive portfolio managers could get some help in the battle against passive investing if a new kind of financial instrument gains traction with investors: the "nontransparent ETF."A nontransparent ETF is an exchange-traded fund that — unlike traditional ETFs — would not disclose what its actual holdings are on a daily basis. Instead, some nontransparent ETFs will publish a portfolio with other stocks that is representative of the underlying strategy. Other nontransparent ETFs will make their holdings available without giving the away the exact weighting of each holding.Previously, traditional mutual-fund managers have been hesitant to put their strategies into ET
The Supreme Court could upend consumer financial protection as we know it

The Supreme Court could upend consumer financial protection as we know it

Finance
Richard SharrocksA case before the Supreme Court has the power to dramatically reshape how the U.S. government polices financial fraud and other misdeeds against consumers — which many experts fear would weaken existing protections and expose the public to more harm.The case, which concerns the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, could ultimately lead to the dissolution of the agency, which lawmakers created in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis and was bestowed with broad powers to issue and enforce consumer protection rules in areas such as banking, student loans, credit reporting, mortgages, payday loans and debt collection.Depending on their verdict, Supreme Court justices could also diminish states' power to investigate and punish financial wrongdoing."It would be effectively a b