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Brokerage bombshell: What advisors, investors could expect from a Schwab-TD Ameritrade merger

Brokerage bombshell: What advisors, investors could expect from a Schwab-TD Ameritrade merger

Finance
Pedestrians pass in front of a Charles Schwab bank branch in downtown Chicago, Illinois.Christopher Dilts | Bloomberg | Getty ImagesFinancial advisors who hold their clients' assets at TD Ameritrade are about to face a shake-up.Charles Schwab is in talks to purchase TD Ameritrade for $ 25 billion, and a deal could be announced as early as Thursday, a source told CNBC.The merger would combine approximately $ 3.8 trillion in assets from Schwab and $ 1.3 trillion from TD Ameritrade and create a massive custodian in an industry that already provides less choice for registered investment advisors or RIAs.Not only do these firms hold assets for registered investment advisors and execute trades, they also provide firms with technology to simplify their workflow and allow advisors to focus on fina...
China could launch its own digital currency in the next 2-3 months, predicts investor

China could launch its own digital currency in the next 2-3 months, predicts investor

Finance
China could start rolling out its digital currency as early as the next two to three months, predicted the managing partner of an investment firm backed by Foxconn Technology Group.China has developed a framework called the Digital Currency Electronic Payment or DCEP, according to Jack Lee, managing partner of HCM Capital. That would allow its central bank to issue a digital currency to commercial banks and third-party payment networks by Alipay and WeChat Pay, he explained."So, they already have all the system and the network ready. I think you will see it very soon, in the next maybe two to three months," Lee told CNBC's Tanvir Gill at the Singapore FinTech Festival on Monday.He said the launch could start as a trial — not to replace physical money completely.HCM Capital has invested in
Illicit fentanyl, carfentanil could be fueling opioid deaths

Illicit fentanyl, carfentanil could be fueling opioid deaths

Health
Nov. 8 (UPI) -- The ongoing opioid abuse crisis in the U.S. has been fueled by a combination of prescription drugs like fentanyl and "street" drugs like heroin. A new analysis of law enforcement drug seizures and overdose deaths in Ohio highlights just how dangerous these cocktails can be. In findings published Friday by the Journal of the American Medical Association, the team from Harm Reduction Ohio, a non-profit drug policy advocacy group, and Ohio Department of Health identified increasing levels of prescription opioid painkillers fentanyl and carfentanil in drug seizures conducted by law enforcement in the state between 2014 and 2017. The trend corresponded with an increase in the number of overdose deaths in the state during the same period, researchers said. Supplies of the presc...
Carbon capture could be climate change solution, or a waste of time

Carbon capture could be climate change solution, or a waste of time

Science
Nov. 8 (UPI) -- Earlier this year, the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy announced $ 110 million in federal funding for research and development of carbon capture and storage projects. According to DOE, carbon capture and storage technologies, or CCS, are "increasingly becoming widely accepted as a viable option" for coal- or gas-fired power plants to reduce their emissions. Carbon capture technologies promise to scrub CO2 from the flumes and exhaust pipes of coal and gas plants. The captured carbon can be permanently buried underground or sold for other uses like making fertilizers or boosting oil extraction. The technologies have been tested on small scales, but high costs have prevented wide-scale adoption. While subsidy-free wind and solar power now offer the cheape...
Mosquito courting strategies could inspire quieter drones

Mosquito courting strategies could inspire quieter drones

Science
Nov. 7 (UPI) -- The rapidly beating wings of a mosquito serve two purposes, according to a new study. The tiny blades keep mosquitoes airborne and help them locate mates. Male mosquitoes work to match their high-frequency buzz to the low-frequency hum of a female. They must carry out their courting rituals while flying through crowded airspace and tracking down their next meal. Engineers at Johns Hopkins University set out to better understand how the mosquito's wings meet the insect's aerodynamic and acoustic needs. Their analysis could be used to design quieter drones or develop chemical-free mosquito control strategies. "The same wings that are producing sound are also essential for them to fly," lead researcher Rajat Mittal, a mechanical engineering professor and expert in computatio...