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Chemistry 'Van Gogh' could help with cancer

Chemistry 'Van Gogh' could help with cancer

Health
"Incredible" images of DNA in action have been captured by scientists who will use them to design cancer drugs.Researcher Dr Alessandro Vannini said the pictures were "beautiful" and in artistic comparisons were "definitely a Van Gogh". They capture a fundamental part of all plant and animal life, called RNA polymerase III, reading the genetic instructions contained in DNA.It is a process that gets hijacked by cancer. Human DNA contains the genetic instructions for building and running the human body. It is RNA polymerase III's job to come along and read the genetic instruction manual. The team at the Institute of Cancer Research used a technique called cryo-electron microscopy, which won the 2017 Nobel Prize for chemistry for revolutionising biochemistry. They purified RNA polymerase III,...
Your ‘Healthy’ Breakfast Could Have More Sugar Than a Dessert. Here’s How to Fix It

Your ‘Healthy’ Breakfast Could Have More Sugar Than a Dessert. Here’s How to Fix It

Health
Wake up to this not-so-sweet truth: Your morning meal may contain a day’s worth of added sugar. There’s no shortage of trendy, healthy breakfast options online. We’re talking smoothie bowls, overnight oats, yogurt parfaits, and even flourless breakfast cookies. Pinterest and Instagram feeds are filled with thousands of melt-in-your-mouth posts gushing about how these nutritious and balanced morning meals will jumpstart your day by giving your body the fuel it needs to conquer the world.There’s just one problem: While the Insta-famous breakfasts tend to have sinful names—think: hot chocolate oatmeal and blueberry pie smoothie—and are promoted as clean, wholesome, and nutritious, the truth is many of these meals resemble a decadent dessert rather than a powerh
Legendary investor Bill Miller: Market could be headed for a 'melt-up' of 30%

Legendary investor Bill Miller: Market could be headed for a 'melt-up' of 30%

Finance
Worried about higher interest rates putting a dent on the stock market's rip-roaring rally? Fear not, a rise in rates will actually help stocks, according to legendary investor Bill Miller."Those 10-year yields go through 2.6 percent and head towards 3 percent, I think we could have the kind of melt-up we had in 2013, where we had the market go up 30 percent," Miller, the founder of Miller Value Partners, told CNBC's "Closing Bell" on Tuesday. "If we can get the 10-year towards that 3 percent level, you'll see the same thing.""In 2013, people finally began to lose money in bonds. They took money out of bond funds and put it into equity funds," Miller said.Miller is considered one of the best investors ever, after beating the market for 15 years in a row while working at Legg Mason. Stocks...
Sanctuary on side of Mexican volcano could be universe model

Sanctuary on side of Mexican volcano could be universe model

Technology
Mexican archaeologists say they have excavated a stone sanctuary in a pond on the side of a volcano east of Mexico City that may have been built as a miniature model of the universe. The National Institute of Anthropology and History says the remnants of the stone "tetzacualco" were in the center of a natural pond below the Iztaccihuatl volcano at an elevation of nearly 13,000 feet. In addition to the sanctuary, decorative pieces associated with the rain god Tlaloc were found nearby. Archaeologist Iris del Rocio Hernandez Bautista says some Mesoamerican creation myths hold that the earth monster Cipactli floated on primeval waters and then split itself, thus creating the heavens and earth. She says the site at Nahualac could emulate that idea.Let's block ads! (Why?) ABC News: Technology
UV light could foil the fungus causing white-nose syndrome in bats

UV light could foil the fungus causing white-nose syndrome in bats

Science
Jan. 2 (UPI) -- Scientists believe they've discovered the Achilles heel of the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome, a disease devastating bat populations across North America. New research suggests the fungus can't survive significant doses ultraviolet light.To better understand the pathogen, researchers with the U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture and the University of New Hampshire compared the fungus, Pseudogymnoascus destructans, to six of its non-pathogenic relatives.Their analysis showed the fungus failed to repair DNA damage caused by exposure to UV light. The discovery -- detailed this week in the journal Nature Communications -- could inspire new treatments for the deadly bat disease."This research has tremendous implications for bats and people," Tony Ferguson,...