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Tag: could

Frozen 'super-Earth' could support life, experts say

Frozen 'super-Earth' could support life, experts say

Technology
A frozen "super-Earth" discovered six light years from Earth could be capable of harbouring life, scientists have said. The rocky planet, at least 3.2 times the size of Earth, is orbiting Barnard's Star, one of the closest and most well studied red dwarf stars in the Galaxy and the sun's nearest neighbouring single star.Known as Barnard's star b, its surface temperatures are estimated at minus 150C. Despite this, scientists believe pockets of liquid water, warmed by geothermal activity, could lie beneath the ice capable of harbouring life.As a red dwarf, Barnard's star is smaller, older and much cooler than the sun. Although the planet is much closer to it than the Earth is to the sun, it's surface remains locked in a blanket of ice. Ima...
Global warming is cooking sperm and could threaten male fertility

Global warming is cooking sperm and could threaten male fertility

Science
Nov. 13 (UPI) -- Heatwaves are frying the sperm inside insects, according to a new study. The findings, published Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications, could help explain why biodiversity continues to decline as the planet warms. "We've shown in this work that sperm function is an especially sensitive trait when the environment heats up, and in a model system representing a huge amount of global biodiversity," Matt Gage, researcher at the University of East Anglia, said in a news release. "Since sperm function is essential for reproduction and population viability, these findings could provide one explanation for why biodiversity is suffering under climate change." Plants and animals can adapt to environmental changes, but studies suggests rapid changes in temperature can trigger ...
Neck scan could indicate dementia risk

Neck scan could indicate dementia risk

Technology
A five-minute neck scan could predict cognitive decline 10 years before symptoms appear, according to scientists. Researchers suggest the quick scan of blood vessels may become a routine part of screening for people at risk of dementia if the results are confirmed in larger studies.The scan identifies whether the vessels in the neck are stiffening, diminishing their ability to protect more delicate vessels around the body from the powerful physical pulses of blood generated by the heart.Ageing and high blood pressure can cause this stiffening, which over time will weaken the protective effect given by healthy, elastic vessels.As a progressively stronger pulse travels into fragile vessels it could cause structural changes in the brain's blood vessel network, as well as minor...
Jeremy Siegel: With tech down for the count, a 'surprise' move could lead the market higher

Jeremy Siegel: With tech down for the count, a 'surprise' move could lead the market higher

Finance
The stock market can "absolutely" go higher even without technology stocks leading the way, Wharton School finance professor Jeremy Siegel told CNBC on Friday. Tech stocks, which have delivered the best returns in recent years, have been hammered lately. October was their worst month since 2008. "We might get surprised by [investors] moving into some more dividend stocks even in a rising interest rate environment because bonds wouldn't be good and people who don't want the risk of tech might say, 'Hey, I want stocks that have had long-term good dividend performance for income,'" Siegel said on "Closing Bell." ...
Ozone hole above Antarctica could be repaired by 2060

Ozone hole above Antarctica could be repaired by 2060

Technology
Amid all the bad news about the environment there is one chink of light - the Earth's ozone layer is healing, scientists say. And the good news includes the huge hole above Antarctica, which is expected to completely vanish by the 2060s.According to a UN report, the upper layer of ozone over the northern hemisphere will be repaired by 2030, and the damage over the southern hemisphere will be back to normal by the middle of the century.The ozone layer's increasing health has been put down to the 1987 Montreal Protocol - an international treaty banning ozone-depleting chemicals, including chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), alongside new technology. Image: The banning of CFCs has helped to repair the ozone hole above Antarctica ...