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Ancient microbes are living inside Europe’s deepest meteorite crater

Ancient microbes are living inside Europe’s deepest meteorite crater

Science
Oct. 18 (UPI) -- Rock cores collected from deep beneath the planet's surface suggest ancient microbes have been living inside Europe's largest meteorite crater for millions of years. Some 400 million years ago, a massive space rock slammed into northern Europe, excavating a giant crater in the middle of what's now Sweden. Today, prospectors are drilling for natural gas within the confines of the ancient crater, the contours of which are called the Siljan Ring. The drilling attempts have yielded fresh rock cores, several of which made their way to geochemistry labs at Linnaeus University in Sweden. When scientists at Linnaeus investigated the rocks, they found evidence of long-term deep microbial activity. "We examined the intensively fractured rock at significant depth in the crater and...
Scientists to search for secret Scottish meteorite crater

Scientists to search for secret Scottish meteorite crater

Technology
Scientists have suggested there is a secret meteorite crater beneath the sea of The Minch strait in northwest Scotland.Researchers from the universities of Oxford and Aberdeen have called for a full geophysical survey of the strait to identify the ancient crater. A crater and meteorite impact were first proposed in 2008 when geologists discovered peculiar rocky debris in the Scottish Highlands which could only have been created by a meteor impact. Image: The Minch strait in northwest Scotland where the crater is believed to be. Pic: Google Dr Ken Amor of the University of Oxford believes he has pinpointed the exact location of the site which he expects to be buried beneath the seafloor.The evidence gathered suggests the impact took pl...
Scientists close in on hidden Scottish meteorite crater

Scientists close in on hidden Scottish meteorite crater

Science
Media playback is unsupported on your device Scientists think the time has come for a full geophysical survey of The Minch, to see if the Scottish strait is hiding an ancient meteorite crater.The idea that such a structure lies between the Western Isles and mainland Scotland was first raised back in 2008.They found evidence on the Highlands coast for the rocky debris that would have been produced by a giant impact.Now, the team from Oxford and Aberdeen universities believes it can pinpoint where the space object fell to Earth.Writing in the Journal of the Geological Society, Dr Ken Amor and colleagues say this location is centred about 15-20km west-northwest of Enard Bay - part way across The Minch towards Stornoway in the Outer Hebrides.The f...
Chang’e-4: Chinese rover ‘confirms’ Moon crater theory

Chang’e-4: Chinese rover ‘confirms’ Moon crater theory

Science
The Chinese Chang'e-4 rover may have confirmed a longstanding idea about the origin of a vast crater on the Moon's far side.The rover's landing site lies within a vast impact depression created by an asteroid strike billions of years ago.Now, mission scientists have found evidence that impact was so powerful it punched through the Moon's crust and into the layer below called the mantle.Chang'e-4 has identified what appear to be mantle rocks on the surface.It's something the rover was sent to the far side to find out.Chunlai Li, from the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing, and colleagues have presented their findings in the journal Nature.The lunar far side, which is turned away from Earth, is more rugged than the familiar nea...
Christmas card from Mars: Images of 82km-wide ice-filled crater

Christmas card from Mars: Images of 82km-wide ice-filled crater

Technology
The European Space Agency's (ESA) Mars Express satellite has sent home spectacular Christmas card images from the Red Planet. The Korolev crater is an 82km-wide (50 mile) impact crater near the planet's north pole.It contains an estimated 2,200 cubic kilometres of water ice, frozen up to an estimated 2km (1.2 miles) deep.ESA's Mars Express mission launched back in 2003. It went into orbit around Mars on Christmas Day of that year, making this month the 15-year anniversary of the beginning of its science programme. The beautiful Christmas card image and two others are "an excellent celebration of such a milestone", according to ESA.They were taken by the Mars Express High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) and the view they offer of the Korolev crater is composed of five di...