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Tag: culture

Army culture, strategy need to transform for 21st century, Gen. James McConville says

Army culture, strategy need to transform for 21st century, Gen. James McConville says

Business
The Army is fighting institutionalized racism and needs to see troops as individuals with distinct experiences instead of as a homogeneous unit, Army Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville said Friday. The Army doesn't have a problem with diversity, but inclusion, McConville said at a Center for Strategic and International Studies event. Advertisement The service branch is already relatively diverse -- the Army is 39% minority, while only 24% of the country is minority. But diversity drops off in higher ranks; 71% of officers are white. In addition to the Army's overt efforts to combat racism, such as effectively banning Confederate flags, promotion boards no longer see photos of candidates to prevent implicit bias, he said. The Air Force has also been discussing race and diversity this su...
Katherine Ryan on dream dinner guests, cancel culture, and not staying silent

Katherine Ryan on dream dinner guests, cancel culture, and not staying silent

Entertainment
Katherine Ryan isn't up for small talk.Having moved to the UK from Canada several years ago, she is very much settled and loves it here, she says. But British people can be too polite. Image: Ryan is taking part in the Table For 1 Million virtual dinner party with David Haye, Paloma Faith and host Nick Grimshaw "I'm very inquisitive," she says, her daughter Violet trying unsuccessfully to blend into the background during a morning Skype interview."I don't like small talk. Moving to Britain - I mean, I love the people here, but some are a little too polite for me."I want to go straight in. I want to know, what's the biggest trauma in your life? What are you excited about? What's going on with your brother-in-law cheating on his wife? ...
Climate change: New rules could spell end of ‘throwaway culture’

Climate change: New rules could spell end of ‘throwaway culture’

Science
New rules could spell the death of a "throwaway" culture in which products are bought, used briefly, then binned.The regulations will apply to a range of everyday items such as mobile phones, textiles, electronics, batteries, construction and packaging.They will ensure products are designed and manufactured so they last - and so they're repairable if they go wrong. It should mean that your phone lasts longer and proves easier to fix.That may be especially true if the display or the battery needs changing. It's part of a worldwide movement called the Right to Repair, which has spawned citizens' repair workshops in several UK cities.The plan is being presented by the European Commission. It's likely to create standards for the UK, ...
Ian Paterson: Surgeon wounded hundreds amid ‘culture of denial’

Ian Paterson: Surgeon wounded hundreds amid ‘culture of denial’

Health
A culture of "avoidance and denial" allowed a breast surgeon to perform botched and unnecessary operations on hundreds of women, a report has found. An independent inquiry into Ian Paterson's malpractice has recommended the recall of his 11,000 patients for their surgery to be assessed.Paterson is serving a 20-year jail term for 17 counts of wounding with intent.One of Paterson's colleagues has been referred to police and five more to health watchdogs by the inquiry. Debbie Douglas, who underwent "needless" surgery while in Paterson's care, said all of the report's 15 recommendations must be implemented.The disgraced breast surgeon worked with cancer patients at NHS and private hospitals in the West Midlands over 14 years. 'The m...
In a 24/7 food culture, periodic fasting gains followers

In a 24/7 food culture, periodic fasting gains followers

Health
NEW YORK -- On low-carb diets, meat and cheese are OK. On low-fat diets, fruit and oatmeal are fine. With the latest diet trend, no foods at all are allowed for long stretches of time. A diet that forbids eating for hours on end might seem doomed in a culture where food is constantly available, but apps and Facebook groups are popping up for people practicing "intermittent fasting." Bri Wyatt, a 32-year-old Tennessee resident, tried it this summer. “At first I was like, there’s no way,” she said. But after reading more about it, she thought it might not be that hard. She started by skipping breakfast and night-time snacks, and later moved on to a 60-day challenge of fasting every other day. Melissa Breaux Bankston, a Crossfit instructor in New Orleans, Louisiana, also tried intermitten