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Tag: damage

Research: Blood thinner reduces risk after heart damage in surgery

Research: Blood thinner reduces risk after heart damage in surgery

Health
March 12 (UPI) -- A blood-thinning drug significantly reduces the risk of complications from a heart injury after major non-cardiac surgery, report researchers in Canada.Researchers found dabigatran was effective in the first randomized controlled study to evaluate ways to reduce such heart injuries, according to study results presented last week at the American College of Cardiology's annual conference in Orlando last week. Dabigatran is sold under the brand name Pradaxa, which is made by Boehringer Ingelheim, a drugmaker that helped fund the study.The study was conducted by the Population Health Research Institute of McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences in Ontario, Canada."We now have an option for improving outcomes for a large population of people who have a heart injury af...
All that pecking may give woodpeckers brain damage

All that pecking may give woodpeckers brain damage

Science
Feb. 2 (UPI) -- Turns out, woodpeckers do get brain damage. All that pecking comes at a price, new research shows -- or does it?Until now, many assumed woodpeckers had a remarkably resilient brain. Woodpeckers absorb 1,200 to 1,400 g's of force every time they slam their head and beak into a tree. Just 60 to 100 g's is enough to cause a concussion in humans."There have been all kinds of safety and technological advances in sports equipment based on the anatomic adaptations and biophysics of the woodpecker assuming they don't get brain injury from pecking," Peter Cummings, researcher at the Boston University School of Medicine, said in a news release. "The weird thing is, nobody's ever looked at a woodpecker brain to see if there is any damage."When scientists analyzed the brains of woodpec...
Repeated head hits, not concussions, may lead to brain damage, study says

Repeated head hits, not concussions, may lead to brain damage, study says

Health
Jan. 18 (UPI) -- Researchers reported Thursday that repeated hits to the head, including in sports and on the battlefield, lead to chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE -- even without a concussion.The team, led by Dr. Lee Goldstein, published the findings in the journal Brain after a seven-year study. Researchers from Boston University, where Goldstein works, as well as scientists from the Cleveland Clinic, Harvard Medical School, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, Ben-Gurion University in Israel and Oxford University contributed to the study.A number of high-profile athletes have developed the Alzheimer's-like disease but it's also been found in service members hurt in roadside bombs and other blasts."Most hits to the head are not concussive... but no one is paying ...
Are plastic nanoparticles causing brain damage in fish?

Are plastic nanoparticles causing brain damage in fish?

Science
Sept. 25 (UPI) -- Fish may be suffering brain damage as a result of plastic pollution. New research shows plastic nanoparticles can end up inside the brains of fish."Our study is the first to show that nanosized plastic particles can accumulate in fish brains," Tommy Cedervall, a chemistry researcher at Lund University in Sweden, said in a news release.Cedervall and his colleagues tracked the path of tiny plastic particles through marine food chains. The nanoparticles can be consumed by plankton, and the plastic-stuffed plankton can be eaten by fish. If the plastic particles are small enough, they can sidestep the blood-brain barrier and accumulate inside a fish's brain.In tests, researchers found fish with plastic particles inside their brain tend to eat slower and spend less time explori...
Do e-cigarettes damage blood vessels?

Do e-cigarettes damage blood vessels?

Health
MONDAY, Sept. 11, 2017 -- Nicotine in e-cigarettes may cause stiffened arteries, which can lead to an increased risk for heart attack and stroke, a small Swedish study suggests.With the dramatic increase in e-cigarette use ("vaping") over the past few years, questions have arisen about their safety. And while many people think the devices are harmless, especially compared with regular cigarettes, little is known about long-term effects of these devices, according to lead researcher Magnus Lundback, from the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm."Increased arterial stiffness has previously been demonstrated following exposure to conventional cigarettes," said Lundback, who is a research leader and clinical registrar at the Danderyd University Hospital."We think that chronic exposure to e-cigare...