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Tag: data

Intel underfoot: Floor sensors rise as retail data source

Intel underfoot: Floor sensors rise as retail data source

Technology
The next phase in data collection is right under your feet. Online clicks give retailers valuable insight into consumer behavior, but what can they learn from footsteps? It's a question Milwaukee-based startup Scanalytics is helping businesses explore with floor sensors that track people's movements. The sensors can also be used in office buildings to reduce energy costs and in nursing homes to determine when someone falls. But retailers make up the majority of Scanalytics' customers, highlighting one of several efforts brick-and-mortar stores are undertaking to better understand consumer habits and catch up with e-commerce giant Amazon. Physical stores have been at a disadvantage because they "don't have that granular level of understanding as to where users are entering, what they're do...
Apple health data used in murder trial

Apple health data used in murder trial

Technology
Health data has provided crucial evidence at a trial in Germany, in which a refugee is accused of rape and murder.Apple's Health App accurately records steps and has been pre-installed on the iPhone 6S and newer models.Data suggesting the suspect was climbing stairs could correlate to him dragging his victim down a riverbank and climbing back up, police said.The accused - Hussein K - has admitted his guilt but disputed some details.The 19-year-old medical student Maria Ladenburger was murdered in October 2016 and the trial - at the district court in Freiburg - started in September.Ms Ladenburger was raped and drowned in the River Dresiam.The suspect - identified by a hair found at the scene of the crime - refused to provide police with the PIN code to his phone so investigating officers tu...
Data scientists mine government data for evidence of historical events

Data scientists mine government data for evidence of historical events

Science
Dec. 29 (UPI) -- Researchers have developed a way to mine electronic government records for evidence of significant historical events.For journalists and historians, sorting through government records is a tedious but important job. Though many government records aren't released until after a news event has come and gone, once published, the documents can shed new light historical happenings.Data scientists at Columbia University in New York have developed a way to more quickly and efficiently identify insightful and important government documents.Researchers tested their new data mining methodology on newly available classified records dated between 1973 and 1977. The records include 1.4 million declassified cables, as well as metadata related to 400,000 documents delivered via diplomatic...
Facebook founder in fresh bet on data start-up

Facebook founder in fresh bet on data start-up

Business
A firm which invests part of the vast wealth of the founders of Facebook, Linkedin and Twitter is leading a €40m (£35m) fundraising for Collibra, a Brussels-based data start-up.Sky News has learnt that Iconiq Ventures, one of Silicon Valley's most prominent venture capital firms, has agreed to back a funding round for Collibra which values it at €325m (£289m).The deal, which is expected to close shortly, will increase Iconiq's stake in Collibra nearly a year after it first backed the company.Iconiq's clients include Mark Zuckerberg, the founder and chief executive of Facebook; Jack Dorsey, his counterpart at Twitter; and Reid Hoffman, co-founder of Linkedin, the Microsoft-owned professional networking app.Image:Iconiq's clients include Twitter's founder, Jack Dorsey.To date, it has taken s
Military law enforcement inconsistent in reporting crime data

Military law enforcement inconsistent in reporting crime data

Business
Dec. 5 (UPI) -- The Pentagon's Inspector General said in a new report that law enforcement organizations within the Armed Forces "did not consistently" submit fingerprint and final disposition reports to the Federal Bureau of Investigation.The U.S. Air Force and Secretary of Defense James Mattis launched reviews last month of how the military reports criminal records after former Airman David P. Kelley killed 26 people at a church in Texas.Kelley had been convicted of domestic violence and served one year in military prison, however that information had not been entered into the FBI database -- which would have disqualified him from owning a firearm.The report released Tuesday by the Department of Defense, which was already been in progress at the time of the shooting in Texas, found that ...