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Tag: data

Satellite data offers enhanced view of Earth's tectonic structures

Satellite data offers enhanced view of Earth's tectonic structures

Science
Nov. 5 (UPI) -- New satellite surveys and fresh gravity datasets are helping scientists image tectonic structures, revealing links between Antarctica and the rest of Earth's continents. Using data collected by the European Space Station's GOCE mission -- short for Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer -- scientists have begun to identify the lithosphere structures that define the movement and evolution of the planet's continents. The insights made possible by the newly analyzed GOCE data offer a view of Earth's tectonics distinct from seismic surveys. Until now, detailed images of Antarctica's underlying tectonic structures have been hard to come by. By analyzing gradients in the gravity data collected by ESA's GOCE satellites, scientists were able to produce "curvatur...
Apple CEO backs privacy laws, warns data being 'weaponized'

Apple CEO backs privacy laws, warns data being 'weaponized'

Technology
The head of Apple on Wednesday endorsed tough privacy laws for both Europe and the U.S. and renewed the technology giant's commitment to protecting personal data, which he warned was being "weaponized" against users. Speaking at an international conference on data privacy, Apple CEO Tim Cook applauded European Union authorities for bringing in a strict new data privacy law in May and said the iPhone maker supports a U.S. federal privacy law . Cook's speech, along with video comments from Google and Facebook top bosses, in the European Union's home base in Brussels, underscores how the U.S. tech giants are jostling to curry favor in the region as regulators tighten their scrutiny. Data protection has become a major political issue worldwide, and European regulators have led the charge in ...
Gravity data details Ceres wandering pole

Gravity data details Ceres wandering pole

Science
Oct. 8 (UPI) -- Ceres, the solar system's innermost dwarf planet, features a wandering pole, new research confirms. Using gravity data collected by NASA's Dawn mission, researchers at the Planetary Science Institute were able to map density variations in Ceres crust, revealing topographical anomalies best explained by a polar reorientation. "The topography shows the remnants of an equatorial ridge compatible with the position of the paleo-equator," researchers wrote in a paper published this week in the journal Nature Geoscience. The axis around which a planetary body spins affects the density of the body's outer layers, including the crust. When the axis shifts and poles reorient themselves, crustal or topographical anomalies can emerge. On Ceres, scientists found evidence of a former e...
Irish regulator opens Facebook data breach investigation

Irish regulator opens Facebook data breach investigation

Technology
Ireland's data regulator has launched an investigation of Facebook over a recent data breach that allowed hackers access to 50 million accounts. The probe could potentially cost Facebook more than $ 1.6 billion in fines. The Irish Data Protection Commission said Wednesday that it will look into whether the U.S. social media company complied with European regulations that went into effect earlier this year covering data protection. It's the latest headache for Facebook in Europe, where authorities are turning up the heat on dominant tech firms over data protection. Last month, European Union consumer protection chief Vera Jourova said that she was growing impatient with Facebook for being too slow in clarifying the fine print in its terms of service covering what happens to user data and ...
Data suggests scientists have found first known exomoon

Data suggests scientists have found first known exomoon

Science
Oct. 3 (UPI) -- The existence of a large exomoon orbiting a gas giant located 8,000 light-years form Earth best explains a unique pattern of stellar dimming observed by both Kepler and the Hubble Space Telescope. "We are unable to find any other single hypothesis that explains all the data that we have," astronomer David Kipping told reporters during a phone call earlier this week. Kipping and his colleague Alex Teachey, both researchers at Columbia University, detailed their investigation of the Hubble and Kepler data in a new paper published Wednesday in the journal Science Advances. The duo began their research by surveying 284 Kepler-discovered planets with long orbits. Planets too close to their host stars are less likely to feature moons. Of the 284 candidates, one stood out. The tr...