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Tag: deep

Fish evolved near shorelines, not in deep waters, study says

Fish evolved near shorelines, not in deep waters, study says

Science
Oct. 26 (UPI) -- Fish likely evolved from shallow shorelines, dating back more than 400 years ago, according to scientists. New findings were published in Science magazine Friday on the evolution of vertebrae fish during the middle Paleozoic era, from 480 million to 360 million years ago. The study was conducted by a team of researchers from the University of Pennsylvania, University of Michigan, University of Manchester and University of Birmingham. The team focused primarily on fossil vertebrates, both jawed and jawless fish. Scientists found that larger fish diversified near shorelines, and later thinner fish populated deeper marine and freshwater habitats. Their goal was to "complete a missing link in our evolutionary story" by closing some of the gaps of what researchers knew about ...
The 'ugly duckling' fossil from the deep

The 'ugly duckling' fossil from the deep

Science
The mosasaurs recently took a star turn in the Jurassic World movie, showing off the Hollywood version of their fearsome jaws.Now an "ugly duckling" from 85 million years ago is shedding new light on the giant marine reptiles that lived at the time of Tyrannosaurus rex.Scientists have long puzzled over how the diminutive fossil fitted into the family tree.They now think it was still developing the distinctive long snout of its clan.Takuya Konishi, a biology professor at the University of Cincinnati, took a second look at a small fossil unearthed more than 25 years ago in a rock formation in Kansas.He found a protruding snout - the telltale sign of a Tylosaurus, a type of mosasaur that grew up to 13m in length."The degree of snout...
Watch: Liverpool's Daniel Sturridge dips deep equalizer vs. Chelsea

Watch: Liverpool's Daniel Sturridge dips deep equalizer vs. Chelsea

Sports
Sept. 29 (UPI) -- Daniel Sturridge saved Liverpool from a Premier League loss to Chelsea with a score in the 89th minute on Saturday at Stamford Bridge in London. Sturridge received a pass from Xherdan Shaqiri while about 30 yards out from the Chelsea goal with his team trailing 1-0. He tapped the ball to his left before scooping a shot toward the far post. The attempt sailed high above the box as it drifted toward the right top corner of the net. The ball eventually dropped over a leaping Kepa Arrizabalaga and fell into the net. "It was just trying to get into that position, to get on the ball and players like Shaq always play it forward as much as possible, so I just tried to create myself as much time as possible," Sturridge told LiverpoolFC.com. "I saw Kante coming and took one touch ...
Deep brain stimulation promising for mild Alzheimer's patients older than 65

Deep brain stimulation promising for mild Alzheimer's patients older than 65

Health
June 19 (UPI) -- Alzheimer's patients older than 65 benefit the most benefit from deep brain stimulation, according to findings from a recent phase II clinical trial. Researchers at Toronto Western Hospital's Krembil Neuroscience Center for two years have been studying the stimulation of the fornix, a bundle of nerve fibers in the brain between the hippocampus and the hypothalamus. The findings, published this month in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, are an analysis of follow-up data during the second 12 months of a 2016 clinical trial. "We are encouraged by these findings as they continue to help us identify who will benefit most from DBS to treat Alzheimer's disease and learn more about this illness," Dr. Andres Lozano, a neurosurgeon at the Krembil Neuroscience Center and principa...
Warm rock rising deep beneath New England, seismic study reveals

Warm rock rising deep beneath New England, seismic study reveals

Science
Dec. 1 (UPI) -- Deep beneath New England, a giant mass of warm rock is slowly but steadily rising toward the surface. The revelation undermines some of what scientists thought they understand about plate tectonics and the geology of the mantle."The upwelling we detected is like a hot air balloon, and we infer that something is rising up through the deeper part of our planet under New England," researcher Vadim Levin, a geophysicist and professor at Rutgers University-New Brunswick, said in a news release.The mass of rock is not on the scale of Yellowstone. It measures a couple hundred miles across, and though it may one day form a new volcanic system, it is unlikely to yield an eruption for millions of years.Scientists were first alerted to something peculiar after noticing a temperature a...