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Tag: depression

Excess screen time linked with depression, suicidal behaviors in teens

Excess screen time linked with depression, suicidal behaviors in teens

Health
Nov. 14 (UPI) -- Researchers believe excess screen time may be increasing symptoms of depression, as well as suicide-related behaviors and thoughts, among teens in the United States.Scientists found the link between depression and time spent in front of TVs, tablets and phones was especially strong among teenage girls."These increases in mental health issues among teens are very alarming," Jean Twenge, psychology professor at San Diego State University, said in a news release. "Teens are telling us they are struggling, and we need to take that very seriously."According to data collected by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the suicide rate for females between the ages of 13 and 18 increased 65 percent from 2010 to 2015.Researchers compared the data with a pair of anonymo...
Your Instagram feed may reveal if you have depression, study finds

Your Instagram feed may reveal if you have depression, study finds

Health
Your Instagram feed may be better at recognizing signs of depression than your doctor, according to a study from researchers at Harvard University and the University of Vermont. Researchers used a machine learning computer program to analyze 43,950 Instagram photos from 166 participants. They found that the computer's analysis of Instagram feeds was better at diagnosing depression than a general practitioner. The study, spearheaded by Andrew G. Reece at Harvard University's Department of Psychology and Chirstopher M. Danforth at the University of Vermont's Computational Story Lab, also found that certain Instagram filters were associated with depression. People with depression tended to either not use filters, or use to disproportionately favor the "Inkwell" filter -- which makes your ...
Back pain patients with depression often prescribed opioids

Back pain patients with depression often prescribed opioids

Health
WEDNESDAY, June 21, 2017 -- Patients with low back pain who are depressed are more likely to be prescribed opioids, and to be prescribed higher doses, a new study finds.Low back pain is a leading cause of disability in the United States and the most common reason for opioid prescriptions, the researchers said."There is strong evidence that depressed patients are at greater risk for misuse and overdose of opioids," said study senior author Dr. John Markman. He directs the University of Rochester Medical Center's Translational Pain Research Program, in New York.The analysis of nationwide data on nearly 5,400 people from 2004 to 2009 found that patients with back pain who screened positive for depression were more than twice as likely to be prescribed an opioid painkiller. Over a year's time,...