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Tag: depression

Sleeping in rooms with even a little light can increase risk of depression: Study

Sleeping in rooms with even a little light can increase risk of depression: Study

Health
Exposure to light at night, even at very low levels, has been linked to an increased risk of depression, according to a study published this month in the American Journal of Epidemiology. In general, nighttime light has been shown to disrupt internal sleep/wake cycles, which is an ever-growing concern as more people are using their phones and tablets in bed, or leaving the TV on as they sleep. But the new report goes further, measuring bedroom exposure to low levels of nighttime light using a portable light meter attached to the bed. Researchers followed nearly 900 elderly people in Japan for two years and assessed symptoms of depression and tested sleep/wake patterns throughout the night. They took into account weight, smoking or drinking habits, income level and medication use. Histo...
Depression linked to reduced levels of amino acid: study

Depression linked to reduced levels of amino acid: study

Health
Feb. 21 (UPI) -- Reduced levels of an amino acid found in blood samples have been linked to major depressive disorder, according to a new study in Finland.Researchers with the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital studied 99 adults aged 20-71 with diagnosed major depressive disorder and 253 non-depressed control adults in a report published Wednesday in the Journal of Affective Disorders.The body uses the amino acid arginine to produce nitric oxide, which is a mediator for the nervous system and immune defender, and plays a role in vascular regulation. Reduced arginine is also a known risk factor of cardiovascular diseases."It is possible that depression-induced inflammatory responses lead to reduced arginine levels," doctoral student Toni Ali-Sisto, the lead author ...
Is social media causing childhood depression?

Is social media causing childhood depression?

Technology
Rangan Chatterjee is a GP and says he has seen plenty of evidence of the link between mental ill-health in youngsters and their use of social media. One 16 year-old boy was referred to him after he self-harmed and ended up in A&E."The first thought was to put him on anti-depressants but I chatted to him and it sounded like his use of social media was having a negative impact on his health."So Dr Chatterjee suggested a simple solution - the teenager should attempt to wean himself off social media, restricting himself to just an hour before he went to bed. Over the course of a few weeks, he should extend this to two hours at night and two in the morning."He reported a significant improvement in his wellbeing and, after six months, I had a letter from his mother saying he was happier at s...
Excess screen time linked with depression, suicidal behaviors in teens

Excess screen time linked with depression, suicidal behaviors in teens

Health
Nov. 14 (UPI) -- Researchers believe excess screen time may be increasing symptoms of depression, as well as suicide-related behaviors and thoughts, among teens in the United States.Scientists found the link between depression and time spent in front of TVs, tablets and phones was especially strong among teenage girls."These increases in mental health issues among teens are very alarming," Jean Twenge, psychology professor at San Diego State University, said in a news release. "Teens are telling us they are struggling, and we need to take that very seriously."According to data collected by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the suicide rate for females between the ages of 13 and 18 increased 65 percent from 2010 to 2015.Researchers compared the data with a pair of anonymo...
Your Instagram feed may reveal if you have depression, study finds

Your Instagram feed may reveal if you have depression, study finds

Health
Your Instagram feed may be better at recognizing signs of depression than your doctor, according to a study from researchers at Harvard University and the University of Vermont. Researchers used a machine learning computer program to analyze 43,950 Instagram photos from 166 participants. They found that the computer's analysis of Instagram feeds was better at diagnosing depression than a general practitioner. The study, spearheaded by Andrew G. Reece at Harvard University's Department of Psychology and Chirstopher M. Danforth at the University of Vermont's Computational Story Lab, also found that certain Instagram filters were associated with depression. People with depression tended to either not use filters, or use to disproportionately favor the "Inkwell" filter -- which makes your ...