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Tag: develop

Thales to develop Rafale F4 sensors for French military

Thales to develop Rafale F4 sensors for French military

Business
Jan. 18 (UPI) -- France's defense ministry has awarded Thales a contract to develop onboard sensors and communication systems for Rafale F-4 combat aircraft. The agreement allows the combat aircraft "to maintain its superiority against new threats," Thales said in a news release Friday. On Monday, France's government signed a $ 2.3 billion contract for 28 updated Rafale fighter jets from French-headquartered Dassault Aviation. In all, 500 French firms are part of the Rafale program, including Dassault Aviation, which will serve as the industrial architect and be responsible for deploying new connectivity solutions. Rafale's role includes reconnaissance, air defense and precision strikes during a single mission. The company noted the aircraft is "a crucial component of France's National S...
L3, Northrop team to develop Next Generation Jammer for Navy

L3, Northrop team to develop Next Generation Jammer for Navy

Business
Oct. 26 (UPI) -- L3 Technologies and Northrop Grumman have won contracts totaling $ 71 million to test and fix the low radio frequency jamming system, or low pod, for the U.S. Navy. The cost-plus-fixed-fee contract, announced Thursday by the Department of Defense, will pay L3 $ 36 million and Northrop $ 35 million to perform work on Increment 2 of the Navy's Next Generation Jammer Low Band program. The contract calls for improvements to the low, medium and high frequencies of jamming systems on EA-18G military aircraft. "We have a mature and exceedingly capable offering for Next Generation Jammer Low Band," a Northrop spokesman told USNI News in a statement. "Northrop Grumman stands ready to demonstrate that technology." The Navy will obligate $ 15 million to both L3 and Northrop at the t...
Bible helps scientists develop more sophisticated translation algorithm

Bible helps scientists develop more sophisticated translation algorithm

Science
Oct. 24 (UPI) -- Computers are getting better at translation, but they're not yet as capable as humans, who can capture nuance in the language and translate text for different affect, depending on the audience. To develop more sophisticated translation algorithms, capable of translating for style, researchers at Dartmouth College turned to the Bible. Because the Bible has been translated so many times, the text and its many derivatives offer machine learning algorithms a uniquely vast dataset from which to learn. Researchers used the many translations of the Bible's 31,000 verses to produce more than 1.5 million unique translation pairings. The dataset allowed the algorithms to learn how the same text can be translated myriad ways -- each offering a unique style. "The English-language Bi...
Scientists develop way to supercool liquids without freezing them

Scientists develop way to supercool liquids without freezing them

Science
Aug. 10 (UPI) -- Researchers at the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Engineering in Medicine have developed a new way to supercool liquids without freezing them. Scientists used the method to significantly decrease the freezing points of water and water-based solutions, allowing them to keep the liquids at extremely cold temperatures for a long period of time. To prevent freezing, scientists relied on insulation. "Our approach, which we dubbed 'deep supercooling,' is simply to cover the surface of such a liquid with a solution that does not mix with water, like mineral oil, to block the interface between water and air, which is the major site of crystallization," researcher Berk Usta said in a news release. "This surprisingly simple, practical and low-cost approach to supercoolin...
Researchers develop bacteria that may treat constipation

Researchers develop bacteria that may treat constipation

Health
June 14 (UPI) -- Genetically engineered bacteria helped treat constipation in mice, according to a study. Researchers at the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine developed bacteria that produced large amounts of the chemical tryptamine, which helps food pass through the intestines with potentially less risk of side effects than other constipation drugs. The scientists, who published their findings Wednesday in the journal Cell Host & Microbe, said clinical human trials won't be conducted for at least three years. Probiotics, which are live bacteria that can aid in digestion, are not effective for everyone because the mix of bacteria found in the stomach and intestines is unique to each person. And changes in diet also don't always work because people's genes and microbiomes are...