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Scientists develop way to supercool liquids without freezing them

Scientists develop way to supercool liquids without freezing them

Science
Aug. 10 (UPI) -- Researchers at the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Engineering in Medicine have developed a new way to supercool liquids without freezing them. Scientists used the method to significantly decrease the freezing points of water and water-based solutions, allowing them to keep the liquids at extremely cold temperatures for a long period of time. To prevent freezing, scientists relied on insulation. "Our approach, which we dubbed 'deep supercooling,' is simply to cover the surface of such a liquid with a solution that does not mix with water, like mineral oil, to block the interface between water and air, which is the major site of crystallization," researcher Berk Usta said in a news release. "This surprisingly simple, practical and low-cost approach to supercoolin...
Researchers develop bacteria that may treat constipation

Researchers develop bacteria that may treat constipation

Health
June 14 (UPI) -- Genetically engineered bacteria helped treat constipation in mice, according to a study. Researchers at the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine developed bacteria that produced large amounts of the chemical tryptamine, which helps food pass through the intestines with potentially less risk of side effects than other constipation drugs. The scientists, who published their findings Wednesday in the journal Cell Host & Microbe, said clinical human trials won't be conducted for at least three years. Probiotics, which are live bacteria that can aid in digestion, are not effective for everyone because the mix of bacteria found in the stomach and intestines is unique to each person. And changes in diet also don't always work because people's genes and microbiomes are...
BAE to develop conflict modeling software for DARPA

BAE to develop conflict modeling software for DARPA

Business
June 12 (UPI) -- BAE Systems has been contracted by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency to develop software that models political and military conflicts around the world. The $ 4.2 million contract, announced Monday by the defense contractor, is the first phase of software development for the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory as part of its Causal Exploration of Complex Operational Environments program. The software -- called Causal Modeling for Knowledge Transfer, Exploration and Temporal Simulation, or CONTEXTS -- is meant to help the Department of Defense model political, territorial and economic tensions that lead to military conflicts as a means of helping to plan ahead for them. "Military planners often conduct manual research and use limited modelling tools to generate ...
Thales to develop sonar system for new French sub

Thales to develop sonar system for new French sub

Business
Feb. 8 (UPI) -- France has awarded Thales a 42-month contract to complete design of a sonar system for the country's third-generation nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarine.Two years ago, Thales was awarded a contract by France to develop the linear antenna towed based on optical technology.Thales said in a release the technology is building on advances in algorithms and the digital revolution in a large antenna system and related processing capabilities.Thales said the program consolidates its leadership in underwater systems and expands the company's involvement in major French naval defense programs, including the SNLE second-generation nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarines, Rubis and Barracuda class nuclear-powered attack submarines, FREMM multi-mission frigates, the ATL2 m...
Researchers develop synthetic, bacteria-killing virus

Researchers develop synthetic, bacteria-killing virus

Health
Jan. 24 (UPI) -- Researchers at University College London on Wednesday announced they have developed a laboratory-built virus that kills unwanted bacteria on contact.The breakthrough, detailed in a study published in the journal Nature Communications, comes from researchers at UCL, as well as Britain's National Physical Laboratory. They created a synthetic hollow shell 20 nanometers wide, or less than 0.0000008 inch, which emulates naturally occurring viruses. The artificial viruses recognize and then destroy the membranes of bacteria.The discovery demonstrates a new approach to treating infectious and antibiotic-resistant diseases, the researchers said."We used high-resolution and real-time imaging to see the impact of the synthetic viruses on bacterial model membranes and found that they...