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Tag: device

Device helps blind, low-vision users better browse web pages

Device helps blind, low-vision users better browse web pages

Health
April 18 (UPI) -- Low vision and blind people successfully navigated web pages using a traditional screen reader, keyboard and new technology, according to researchers.Engineers at the University of Washington and Carnegie Mellon University have developed a way for them to access tables, maps and nested lists.The engineers plan to present their work on April 25 at Association for Computing Machinery's CHI 2018 conference in Montreal."We're not trying to replace screen readers, or the things that they do really well," Dr. Jennifer Mankoff, a professor in UW's School of Computer Science, said in a press release. "But tables are one place that it's possible to do better. This study demonstrates that we can use the keyboard to bring tangible, structured information back, and the benefits are e...
Earwig wings inspire scientists working on foldable device designs

Earwig wings inspire scientists working on foldable device designs

Science
March 22 (UPI) -- When most people think of origami, they think of a swan or a butterfly. When a group of scientists in Switzerland think of origami, they think of an earwig.Researchers at ETH Zurich say the wing of an earwig is the perfect example of origami's design principles.When folded, the earwig's wing fits snuggly and compactly against its body, allowing it to tunnel into the soil. When it emerges from dirt, the wing expands, increasing its surface area by a factor of ten and allowing the insect to take flight.What's more, the wing is so structurally sound that it doesn't require muscle activation for stability. It also folds into itself with a simple click -- a model of efficiency.To better understand the wing's genius, scientists at ETH Zurich set out to recreate it. While tradit...
Handheld device sequences human genome

Handheld device sequences human genome

Health
Scientists have used a device that fits in the palm of the hand to sequence the human genome.They say the feat, detailed in the journal Nature Biotechnology, opens up exciting possibilities for using genetics in routine medicine. It is a far cry from the effort to sequence the first human genome which started in 1990. The Human Genome Project took 13 years, laboratories around the world and hundreds of millions of dollars. Since then there has been a revolution in cracking the code of life. Science enters $ 1,000 genome eraProf Nicholas Loman, one of the researchers and from the University of Birmingham, UK, told the BBC: "We've gone from a situation where you can only do genome sequencing for a huge amount of money in well equipped labs to one where we can have genome sequencing literally...
Data-collecting device could make for better training of soldiers

Data-collecting device could make for better training of soldiers

Business
Nov. 30 (UPI) -- The Greek poet Archilochus, before his death, said people "don't rise to the level of our expectations, we fall to the level of our training."A device displayed at a defense industry conference this week could help military commanders provide more realistic training scenarios and better understand how soldiers will react before sending them into war, according to the company that makes it -- helping commanders and their soldiers perform better under the stresses of military missions.Design Interactive, an Orlando-based company that specializes in metric-driven data on behavioral, physiological and neurophysiological techniques, has designed a device to help commanders determine if training scenarios are putting adequate, and appropriate, levels of stress on their soldiers....
'Pen' device can spot cancer in 10 seconds

'Pen' device can spot cancer in 10 seconds

Technology
Scientists have invented a device the size of the pen which can detect cancer in a matter of seconds, aiding surgeons to remove "every last trace" of the disease.The device is capable of identifying cancerous cells 150 times faster than conventional technologies and was 96% accurate in tests.Researchers from the University of Texas say that the MasSpec Pen can help surgeons identify which tissue should be removed and which should be preserved, to help patients' recover.Dr Livia Schiavinato Eberlin, who designed the study, said: "If you talk to cancer patients after surgery, one of the first things many will say is 'I hope the surgeon got all the cancer out'."It's just heartbreaking when that's not the case. But our technology could vastly improve the odds that surgeons really do remove eve...