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Tag: devices

Wearable devices could predict risk for senior falls

Wearable devices could predict risk for senior falls

Health
July 12 (UPI) -- Wearable devices with motion sensors can predict older participants' risk of falling, according to a study. Researchers at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign found that measuring unsteadiness in standing and walking can predict the most common injury among adults 65 and older. Their findings were published Wednesday in npj Digital Medicine. Three million older people are treated in emergency departments for fall injuries each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That includes at least 300,000 older people hospitalized for hip fractures, of which 95 percent are caused by falling. Older and young people fall for different reasons. Younger people misjudge something, such as a slippery surface, and older adults are unstable, and lose...
Daimler forced to recall Mercedes with defeat devices

Daimler forced to recall Mercedes with defeat devices

Business
The German government has ordered car maker Daimler to recall 238,000 vehicles in Germany after they were found to be fitted with illegal software that masks diesel emissions.Across Europe a total of 774,000 diesel vehicles contain "defeat devices" and Daimler said it would recall them all. The diesel versions of the Mercedes C-Class, Vito and GLC models are the main ones affected, the ministry said. Daimler said it would refit the software but denied any wrongdoing.It comes three years after VW admitted having fitted "cheat" devices in vehicles that made their engines appear less polluting than they actually were. About eleven million cars worldwide were affected in that case. German transport minister Andreas Scheuer ...
Method devised for wirelessly powering, controlling devices inside body

Method devised for wirelessly powering, controlling devices inside body

Health
June 4 (UPI) -- A prototype device about the size of a grain of rice -- that can receive power and communicate wirelessly from inside the body -- for drug delivery, disease treatment or just health monitoring has been developed by researchers. MIT researchers and scientists from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston have developed the tiny implants -- they expect they can be made even smaller than a grain of rice -- that are powered by radio frequency waves and can safely pass through human tissues. The research on development of the devices will be presented at the Association for Computing Machinery Special Interest Group on Data Communication conference Aug. 20-25 in Budapest, Hungary. "Even though these tiny implantable devices have no batteries, we can now communicate with them fro...
Surveillance devices hidden in everyday items

Surveillance devices hidden in everyday items

Technology
The two plug adapters look identical. Inside one, though, is a microphone, a battery and a SIM card.It is a perfectly disguised bug."After the initial plant you can switch them on and off from anywhere in the world and listen to the room," explains Matt Horan, security director at C31A Solutions."Whereas 10, 15 years ago you would have had to go in, plant a device and then recover that device."Tech has been getting smaller and smarter over the years - and the same goes for surveillance equipment. Mr Horan's job is to hunt them out.Image:Everyday items like plug adapters and calculators can be used to hide surveillance devicesHe shows me a few historical examples: a thick textbook containing an analogue listening device and a radio transmitter."Anyone trying to receive this would have to be...
FBI failed to access 7,000 encrypted mobile devices

FBI failed to access 7,000 encrypted mobile devices

Technology
Agents at the US Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) have been unable to extract data from nearly 7,000 mobile devices they have tried to access, the agency's director has said.Christopher Wray said encryption on devices was "a huge, huge problem" for FBI investigations.The agency had failed to access more than half of the devices it targeted in an 11-month period, he said.One cyber-security expert said such encryption was now a "fact of life".Many smartphones encrypt their contents when locked, as standard - a security feature that often prevents even the phones' manufacturers from accessing data.Such encryption is different to end-to-end encryption, which prevents interception of communications on a large scale.Cyber-security expert Prof Alan Woodward at the University of Surrey said d...