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Anglo Saxon baby teeth could shed light on obesity, diabetes

Anglo Saxon baby teeth could shed light on obesity, diabetes

Science
Sept. 6 (UPI) -- Scientists have developed a new method for measuring the health and development of moms and babies long after they're gone. According to new research, the measure of dentine in the milk teeth, or baby teeth, can serve as a reliable indicator of health among early human populations. For the study, scientists analyzed the baby teeth of more than 1,000 Anglo Saxon children living among the Raunds Furnells settlements. Archaeologists believe the population was under nourished. By comparing the teeth of children who survived the first 1,000 days from conception with those who did not, scientists were able to identify biomarkers that might predict positive and negative health outcomes. Researchers have traditionally relied on bones to study the health of earlier human populati...
Researchers find same hormone plays role in diabetes, hypertension

Researchers find same hormone plays role in diabetes, hypertension

Health
Sept. 5 (UPI) -- Increased levels of a hormone already linked to hypertension also might play a significant role in the development of type 2 diabetes, especially among certain racial groups, according to a study. Researchers at Ohio State University's College of Medicine at the Wexner Medical Center studied whether the hormone aldosterone, which is produced by the adrenal gland, isn't limited to hypertension. The findings were published Wednesday in the Journal of the American Heart Association. Hypertension is common among patients with diabetes and is a strong factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, heart failure and microvascular complications, according to the American Diabetes Association. "I looked into this as a promise to my father. He had high levels of aldosterone th...
Rise in type 2 diabetes in young people in England and Wales

Rise in type 2 diabetes in young people in England and Wales

Health
The number of children and young people being treated for type 2 diabetes in England and Wales has gone up from 507 to 715 in four years, new figures show.More than three-quarters were also obese, according to the NHS data.Child health experts said the rise was "alarming" and the childhood obesity epidemic was "starting to bite".Councils said more needed to be done to tackle the obesity crisis in children, particularly among minority ethnic groups, who were most affected.Type 2 diabetes can lead to a range of health problems such as heart disease, strokes and kidney problems.The condition occurs when the body cannot produce enough insulin to regulate blood sugar levels. It can be linked to obesity.The figures come from an audit published by the Royal Coll...
Research finds potential treatment for obesity, diabetes

Research finds potential treatment for obesity, diabetes

Health
Aug. 9 (UPI) -- Researchers have identified a potential target to treat obesity and diabetes through regulation of energy in the body, according to a study of mice. In findings released Thursday in JCI Insight, researchers from the Colorado School of Medicine outline the biological function of an epigenetic modifier known as histone deacetylase and its potential as a treatment target. White adipose tissue stores energy and brown adipose tissue produces heat, which in turn expends energy. By increasing energy amounts, the researchers believe a regulatory node could lead to new drugs to treat obesity and diabetes. They learned that deleting HDAC11 in mice stimulates brown adipose tissue formation and the absence of the modifier also triggered beiging of white adipose tissue. "Through our i...
Diabetes remission after weight loss linked to improved pancreatic cells

Diabetes remission after weight loss linked to improved pancreatic cells

Health
Aug. 2 (UPI) -- Researchers have figured out why some patients' type 2 diabetes goes into remission from aggressive weight loss -- improved functioning of pancreatic beta cells. Researchers at Newcastle University in England built on their Diabetes Remission Clinical Trial, in which 46 percent of individuals with the diabetes no longer were diabetic on year later if they underwent intensive weight loss. Their new findings, which were published Thursday in the journal Cell Metabolism, challenge the previous belief that beta-cell function is irreversibly lost in type 2 diabetes patients. "This observation carries potentially important implications for the initial clinical approach to management," senior author Dr. Roy Taylor of Newcastle University, who also oversaw the trial, said in a pre...