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Court: Montana family owns dinosaur fossils worth millions

Court: Montana family owns dinosaur fossils worth millions

Technology
An appeals court has ruled dinosaur fossils worth millions of dollars unearthed on an eastern Montana ranch belong to the owners of the land's surface rightsBy AMY BETH HANSON Associated PressJune 23, 2020, 7:03 PM3 min read3 min readShare to FacebookShare to TwitterEmail this articleHELENA, Mont. -- Dinosaur fossils worth millions of dollars unearthed on a Montana ranch belong to the owners of the land’s surface rights, not the owners of the mineral rights, a U.S. appeals court ruled. The June 17 ruling by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a 2016 decision by U.S. District Judge Susan Watters of Billings that found dinosaur fossils were part of the surface estate, not the mineral estate, in cases of split ownership. The surface rights where the fossils were found are ow...
World’s longest predatory dinosaur used its tail to swim

World’s longest predatory dinosaur used its tail to swim

Science
April 29 (UPI) -- Paleontologists finally have proof that some dinosaurs were aquatic. Detailed analysis of the only existing Spinosaurus aegyptiacus remains suggests the world's longest predatory dinosaur lived in a large river system and used its tail to swim. The discovery -- published this week in the journal Nature -- marks the first time a tail-propelled swimming locomotion has been reported in a dinosaur. "This discovery really opens our eyes to this whole new world of possibilities for dinosaurs," lead study author Nizar Ibrahim, professor at the University of Detroit Mercy, said in a news release. "It doesn't just add to an existing narrative, it starts a whole new narrative and drastically changes things in terms of what we know dinosaurs could actually do. There's nothing like...
Smallest known dinosaur found trapped in 99-million-year-old amber

Smallest known dinosaur found trapped in 99-million-year-old amber

Science
March 12 (UPI) -- Paleontologists have discovered a tiny new species of dinosaur trapped in ancient amber from Myanmar. Scientists estimate the bird-like species is the smallest known dinosaur. The skull of the new species, which scientists estimate is fully formed, was found inside 99-million-year-old amber. Its size suggests the unusual dinosaur species was roughly the size of a bee hummingbird, the smallest bird on Earth. "Amber preservation of vertebrates is rare, and this provides us a window into the world of dinosaurs at the lowest end of the body-size spectrum," Lars Schmitz, associate professor of biology at Claremont McKenna College in California, said in a news release. "Its unique anatomical features point to one of the smallest and most ancient birds ever found." Scientists ...
New giant predatory dinosaur species found in Thailand

New giant predatory dinosaur species found in Thailand

Science
Oct. 9 (UPI) -- Paleontologists have discovered a new genus and species of dinosaur. The remains of the giant predatory dinosaur, named Siamraptor suwati, were recovered from the Khok Kruat Formation, an Early Cretaceous rock formation in northeastern Thailand. The newly named species was an allosauroid theropod, a widespread group of apex predators that were active during the Middle Jurassic to Late Cretaceous periods. For the study, scientists surveyed fossils representing the skull, backbone, limbs and hips of at least four individual dinosaurs. By comparing the dinosaur's anatomical structures to those of other allosauroids, scientists determined that the fossils warranted a new genus and species classification. Phylogenetic analysis showed Siamraptor suwati was a basal member of a g...
Bedbugs survived the dinosaur extinction event

Bedbugs survived the dinosaur extinction event

Science
A study that began as an investigation into the "utterly bizarre" way in which bedbugs reproduce has revealed they have existed for far longer than humans. DNA samples from 30 species of bedbug revealed the insects had been around for at least 115 million years. The blood-sucking parasites predate their earliest known hosts - bats - by more than 50 million years. The surprising finding is published in the journal Current Biology.Prof Mike Siva-Jothy, from the University of Sheffield's department of animal and plant sciences, who was part of the research team, said its initial investigation had been into what is known as "traumatic insemination".Male bedbugs have a dagger-like penis, with which they stab the female to inseminate d...