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Tag: disease

Northwestern unveils potential celiac disease treatment

Northwestern unveils potential celiac disease treatment

Health
Oct. 22 (UPI) -- Northwestern Medicine has developed a technology that reduces intolerance to gluten, the new phase 2 clinical trial results show, the university said in a statement on Tuesday. Celiac disease patients in a phase 2 clinical trial were able to eat gluten with substantially less inflammation after the treatment with the technology. Celiac disease is a serious autoimmune disease and digestive disorder where people cannot tolerate gluten in wheat, barley, and rye without damaging the small intestine. The technology consists of a nanoparticle with gluten that "acts like a Trojan horse, hiding the allergen in a friendly shell, to convince the immune system not to attack it," the statement said. The findings were presented Tuesday at the European Gastroenterology Week conferenc...
Cancer research: Scientists seek clues to how disease ‘is born’

Cancer research: Scientists seek clues to how disease ‘is born’

Health
British and American scientists are teaming up to search for the earliest signs of cancer in a bid to detect and treat the disease before it emerges.They plan to "give birth" to cancer in the lab to see exactly what it looks like "on day one".It is just one of the research priorities of the new International Alliance for Cancer Early Detection.Working together on early detection of cancer will mean patients benefitting more quickly, it says.Cancer Research UK has teamed up with the Universities of Cambridge, Manchester, University College London, and Stanford and Oregon in the US, to share ideas, technology and expertise in this area.Already thereTogether, the scientists are aiming to develop less invasive tests, such as blood, breath and urine tests, for...
Batten disease girl given custom-made drug

Batten disease girl given custom-made drug

Health
A girl with a deadly brain disease has been given a unique drug that was invented from scratch just for her and in a fraction of the normal time.Mila Makovec, now aged eight, was diagnosed with fatal and untreatable Batten disease. In less than a year, doctors at Boston Children's Hospital in the US created the tailor-made drug to correct specific errors in Mila's DNA.She is now having far fewer seizures, although she is not cured.Batten diseaseBatten disease is incredibly rare, gets progressively worse and is always fatal.Mila was three when her right foot began to turn inwards. A year later she needed to hold books close to her face as her vision was fading and by the age of five she would occasionally fall and her walk became unusual. At six, Mila was ...
NIH sets five-year plan for tickborne disease research

NIH sets five-year plan for tickborne disease research

Health
Oct. 11 (UPI) -- With an increase of nearly 10,000 cases of tickborne disease from 2016 to 2017 -- mostly lyme disease -- the National Institutes of Health announced a five-year plan to expand research and reduce infections. The NIH on Thursday announced the five-priority, five-year plan to expand research, develop treatment and raise awareness of tickborne diseases, spurred by increases in infection over the last 20 years. The number of tickborne diseases reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention more than doubled from 2004 to 2016, represents more than 75 percent of all vector-borne disease cases and hit a record-high of 59,349 in 2017. In 2016, CDC reported 48,610 cases. The number of tickborne disease cases "is expected to continue to grow as tick species expand thei...
Tsunamis linked to spread of deadly fungal disease

Tsunamis linked to spread of deadly fungal disease

Science
A major earthquake in Alaska in 1964 triggered tsunamis that washed ashore a deadly tropical fungus, scientists say. Researchers believe it then evolved to survive in the coasts and forest of the Pacific Northwest.More than 300 people have been infected with the pneumonia-like cryptococcosis since the first case was discovered in the region in 1999, about 10% fatally. If true the theory, published in the journal mBio, has implications for other areas hit by tsunamis. Cryptococcus gattii is a fungal pathogen that mainly appears in the warmer regions of the world such as Australia, Papua New Guinea and in parts of Europe, Africa and South America, namely Brazil.Researchers have theorised that it has moved around the world via the b...