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Tag: disease

Brain model links herpes virus to development of Alzheimer’s disease

Brain model links herpes virus to development of Alzheimer’s disease

Health
May 6 (UPI) -- Bio-engineered models of the human brain infected with herpes simplex virus-1, or HSV-1, develop many of the same characteristics found in Alzheimer's disease, according to an analysis published Wednesday in the journal Science Advances. Engineers and scientists at Tufts University used a 3D human-tissue culture model designed to mimic the components and conditions of the brain to demonstrate a possible causal relationship between sporadic Alzheimer's disease and HSV-1. After infecting neurons in the brain with HSV-1, the researches observed the same amyloid plaque formation, neuronal loss, neuro-inflammation and diminished neural network functioning found in Alzheimer's disease. Treatment of the brain tissue models with the antiviral drug valacyclovir, which commonly is u...
Deadly olive tree disease across Europe ‘could cost billions’

Deadly olive tree disease across Europe ‘could cost billions’

Science
Researchers say the economic costs of a deadly pathogen affecting olive trees in Europe could run to over €20 billion.They've modelled the future worst impacts of the Xylella fastidiosa pathogen which has killed swathes of trees in Italy. Spread by insects, the bacterium now poses a potential threat to olive plantations in Spain and Greece. The disease could increase the costs of olive oil for consumers.Xylella is considered to be one of the most dangerous pathogens for plants anywhere in the world. At present there is no cure for the infection. It can infect cherry, almond and plum trees as well as olives. It has become closely associated with olives after a strain was discovered in trees in Puglia in Italy in 2013. The organism
Coronavirus: Great apes on lockdown over threat of disease

Coronavirus: Great apes on lockdown over threat of disease

Science
Great apes have been put on lockdown against the threat of coronavirus.Gorilla tourism in Africa has been suspended, while sanctuaries for other apes, such as orangutans, have closed to the public.It's not known if great apes can contract the virus, but there are growing fears that our closest living relatives might be equally at risk.This week a tiger at Bronx Zoo tested positive for coronavirus.New measures have been put in place to protect big cats and their caregivers.Dr Kirsten Gilardi is chief veterinary officer for Gorilla Doctors, which provides veterinary care to gorillas in the forests of Rwanda, Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo. "We don't know if it's infected mountain gorillas; we have not seen any evidence...
COVID-19 linked to cardiac ailments in those with, without cardiovascular disease

COVID-19 linked to cardiac ailments in those with, without cardiovascular disease

Health
March 27 (UPI) -- In new findings released Friday, a review of studies in China highlights that COVID-19 can cause death in people with underlying cardiovascular disease and cause cardiac injury even in those with no history of heart problems. With the new coronavirus spread rapidly in the United States -- now with nearly 100,000 confirmed cases, tops in the world -- healthcare providers are still coming to grips with how the disease progresses and what happens to those who develop serious illness. "It is likely that even in the absence of previous heart disease, the heart muscle can be affected by coronavirus disease," review co-author Dr. Mohammad Madjid, an assistant professor of cardiology with McGovern Medical School at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center, said in a press...
History shows stocks typically rebound from disease outbreaks before long

History shows stocks typically rebound from disease outbreaks before long

Finance
Global markets are suffering.On Monday, the Dow Jones Industrial Average, the S&P 500 and the Nasdaq Composite all fell sharply.Don't hit the panic button just yet. Within six months, stocks are usually on the mend from the fallout of disease outbreaks such as the coronavirus, say experts.These declines aren't the first caused by the respiratory illness that was initially reported in Wuhan, China, in late December, and has since infected more than 79,000 people. Economist Patrick Perret-Green said late last month that the outbreak threatened a "Lehman-type moment" but then stocks rebounded by early February."They recovered all of those losses – and then some," said Jeffrey Kleintop, chief global investment strategist at Charles Schwab.Kleintop compiled research recently on how long sto