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Tag: disease

Video game addiction could be made an official disease

Video game addiction could be made an official disease

Technology
Video game addiction could be made an official disease after it was officially recognised and classified by the World Health Organisation (WHO).The disorder has been suggested by some medics as a distinct behavioural addiction characterised by excessive or compulsive use of computer games or video games that affects an individual's daily life. Last June, WHO included gaming disorder within the 11th revision of its international classification of diseases and next week it will vote on whether to make it an official disease. Games developers have said they are listening to and acting on rising concerns about the disorder.Microsoft said it is giving more power to parents to control how much time their children can spend gaming. Adv...
Olive tree killer disease still poses risk to Europe

Olive tree killer disease still poses risk to Europe

Science
Southern Europe countries are said to be at the greatest risk from a deadly disease described as a "very serious threat" to the EU's olive industry.The European Food Safety Authority (ESFA) says computer modelling has helped understand how it spreads, but there is no cure for infected plants.Experts describe Xylella as one of the "most dangerous pathogens worldwide".It was first recorded in Italy in 2013, and has since spread to other European nations.Olive killer disease reaches Spain"One of the problems of Xylella is that is a bit of a silent spreader," explained Dr Stephen Parnell from the University of Salford and chairman of the EFSA's working group on Xylella fastidiosa pest risk assessment."You can have different lengths ...
Open heart surgery better than stents for multivessel disease, study says

Open heart surgery better than stents for multivessel disease, study says

Health
May 3 (UPI) -- People with multiple blocked arteries of the heart have a better chance for survival if they receive coronary grafting surgery, rather than stents, new findings show. The rate of death for people who underwent coronary artery grafting surgery, known as open heart surgery, was 7.2. percent versus 11.5 for people treated with percutaneous coronary intervention, according to a study published Wednesday in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. Percutaneous coronary intervention is commonly known as angioplasty, which includes opening up a blocked artery and placement of stent to prevent it from collapsing. "Our data demonstrate a significant mortality benefit with coronary artery grafting surgery over percutaneous coronary intervention," said Suresh R. Mulukutla, a researcher at the...
Psychological intervention helps patients prevent gum disease

Psychological intervention helps patients prevent gum disease

Health
April 19 (UPI) -- Researchers observed a reduction in dental plaque and bleeding, as well as an increase in dental cleanings among adults with moderate periodontal disease, according to research published in April in Journal of Periodontology. "Our study shows that by adopting a simple psychological intervention, aided by the use of an online risk assessment tool, we can significantly improve measurable clinical outcomes and reduce initial signs of gum disease in patient seen routinely general dental practice," Koula Asimakopoulou, a researcher at King's College and study lead author, in a news release. Researchers registered 97 adults with moderate peridontal disease in a program at King's College London, offering them either usual dental treatment, treatment and a report on their disea...
Gene-silencing: ‘New class’ of medicine reverses disease porphyria

Gene-silencing: ‘New class’ of medicine reverses disease porphyria

Health
Doctors have used a new type of medicine called "gene silencing" to reverse a disease that leaves people in crippling pain. The condition, acute intermittent porphyria, also causes paralysis and is fatal in some cases. The novel approach fine-tunes the genetic instructions locked in our DNA.Doctors say they are "genuinely surprised" how successful it is and that the same approach could be used in previously untreatable diseases.How bad is porphyria?Sue Burrell, from Norfolk, has endured pain few could imagine and needed to take strong opioid painkillers every day.At one point her porphyria was causing severe attacks every couple of weeks and needed hospital treatment.But even then morphine did not stop the pain. She told the BBC ...