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Tag: disk

Study details the physics of proto-stellar disk formation

Study details the physics of proto-stellar disk formation

Science
Sept. 6 (UPI) -- In studying the movements of a trio of protostars in the Perseus molecular cloud, astronomers have gained new insights into the physical conditions that enable the formation of proto-stellar disks. The basic roadmap for the formation of stellar and planetary systems is well established. Over time, gas and dust in interstellar space coalesce. Eventually, the dense cloud of material collapses under its own gravity. A stellar core forms and, thanks to the conservation of angular momentum, a proto-stellar disk forms. After roughly 100,000 years or more, the star gets dense enough to ignite nuclear fusion. Shortly afterwards, planets form from the proto-stellar disk. But questions remain. The details of how angular momentum enables proto-stellar disk formation remains poorly ...
Astronomers spot a circumplanetary disk for the first time

Astronomers spot a circumplanetary disk for the first time

Science
July 12 (UPI) -- With the help of the ALMA observatory, scientists have identified a circumplanetary disk in a distant star system -- a first. Astronomers found the moon-forming disk of dust and debris circling an exoplanet in orbit around PDS 70, a low-mass T Tauri star located 370 light-years from Earth. T Tauri stars are a class of young stars characterized by their optical variability. During an earlier survey, scientists discovered two new Jupiter-like planets orbiting PDS 70 using the observational abilities of European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope. For the new study, astronomers used Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, a collection of high-precision dish antennas in northern Chile, to measure the faint radio waves emitted by the tiny gas particles surround...
Spinal disk cells in zebrafish can self-repair

Spinal disk cells in zebrafish can self-repair

Science
June 22 (UPI) -- The cells that make up the developing backbone of zebrafish can self-repair, new research shows. Unfortunately these cells disappear as the backbone matures.Before developing a backbone, embryonic and newly hatched zebrafish are supported by a notochord -- a proto-spine. The soft spine structure is similar to a water-filled garden hose. A shell of epithelial cells protects fluid-filled cells called vacuolated cells.Previous studies suggest tiny sacs in the membranes of vacuolated cells, called caveolae, prevent the fluid cells from popping as the young fish begin swimming.Researchers engineered zebrafish to be without caveolae, to see whether the tiny sacs are essential to spinal chord health and development."In the caveolar mutants, you see these serial lesions up and dow...