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You're Basically Wasting Money on Flax Seeds If You Don't Take This Extra Step

You're Basically Wasting Money on Flax Seeds If You Don't Take This Extra Step

Health
If you're stressed for time, you can pay a little extra for the best kind of flaxseed for you. If you've been shelling out dough for flax seed-laden foods—or just for the seeds themselves—you may not be getting all the heart-healthy benefits that you were hoping for.It's true—flax seeds are a great source of omega-3 fatty acids, and it's worth adding them to weeknight meals, like this classic meatloaf and this freshly seared fish.But note that both of those recipes call for ground flax seeds. This is because you have to grind flax seeds before eating or cooking with them.Getty: Arletta Cwalina / EyeEmBrierley Horton, MS, RD, explains that the human body doesn't fully digest whole flax seeds. In order for you to get all the heart-healthy benefits that flax seeds p
Orioles don't get break facing Astros' No. 5 starter

Orioles don't get break facing Astros' No. 5 starter

Sports
The offseason acquisition of right-hander Gerrit Cole was orchestrated to fortify an already stout Astros rotation, one that when fully armed, had the option of utilizing versatile right-hander Brad Peacock in a complementary role en route to the 2017 World Series title. On Sunday against Texas, Cole made his Astros debut and, for at least one start, validated the decision of Houston general manager Jeff Luhnow, working seven strong innings in an 8-2 victory that clinched the four-game series. Cole surrendered one run on two hits and three walks with 11 strikeouts, growing stronger as his outing progressed and capping a collective performance by the Houston rotation that should give the rest of the American League pause. Cole followed right-hander Justin Verlander, left-hander Dallas Keuch...
Don't repeat this mistake from a $559 million Powerball winner

Don't repeat this mistake from a $559 million Powerball winner

Finance
A recent Powerball winner discovered the hard way that trying to remain anonymous after hitting a huge jackpot takes some advance planning.Known only as Jane Doe, the New Hampshire woman who won $ 559.7 million in the Jan. 6 Powerball drawing collected her after-tax winnings of $ 264 million on Wednesday. However, whether she can maintain her anonymity remains in the hands of a judge.At issue is the fact that she signed her name on the back of the ticket upon discovering she won. This is standard advice from lottery experts, because if you are somehow separated from the ticket, your signature should help ensure you still get the prize.However, in this instance, it also meant the winner gave up her ability to shield her identity from the public.New Hampshire law allows lottery officials to...
Diversification: Don't put all your eggs (or money) in one basket

Diversification: Don't put all your eggs (or money) in one basket

Finance
Everyone is familiar with the saying, "Don't put all your eggs in one basket." Even in Shakespeare's play, "The Merchant of Venice," written more than 400 years ago, the character Antonio demonstrates his understanding of the concept when he says: "I thank my fortune for it — my ventures are not in one bottom trusted, nor to one place, nor is my whole estate upon the fortune of this present year."Though savvy investors, like Shakespeare's Antonio, have long understood the benefits of diversification, it was not until the 1950s when an academic named Harry Markowitz introduced research on what he called modern portfolio theory that people were able to understand diversification in an objective, mathematical sense. This research was so groundbreaking it earned Markowitz a trip to Sweden to p
Josh Brown: Don't get sucked into the hype on Barron's call that Apple will hit $1 trillion

Josh Brown: Don't get sucked into the hype on Barron's call that Apple will hit $1 trillion

Finance
Lots of chatter about how this weekend's Barron's cover features a gleaming new Lifesavers-shaped headquarters on the cover with a feature story about why it's destined to be the first $ 1 trillion company.All the usual smartasses are offering commentary about how this is "the kiss of death" or "marks the top" or whatever. Barron's, like every other investor, sometimes gets it right and sometimes gets it wrong. They've made huge, important calls, like the top of the Dot Com Bubble and they've had some notable whiffs, like the infamous "Facebook is worth $ 15" cover from September 2012.They're no more likely or unlikely to get everything right all the time than anyone else is. It takes a certain child-like sort of mindset to expect otherwise.There are no serious professionals who change the...